Vogue Doll Company

 Vogue  Comments Off on Vogue Doll Company
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Beautiful hard plastic Ginny doll in her original trunk with outfits.

Vogue Dolls was responsible for some of the loveliest and most popular dolls of the 20th century. The company was at its height in the 1950s, when Ginny and Ginnette were imitated by nearly every other doll company in America, clamoring for a share of the market for 8″ dolls and their fashions.

Jennie Graves of Somerville, Massachusetts, began her career in the doll business in 1925 by buying nude dolls, dressing them, and selling them through department stores in the Boston area. She soon hired neighborhood women as home sewers to keep up with demand, and opened her own store, the Vogue Doll Shoppe. Throughout the twenties, thirties and forties, Mrs. Graves purchased dolls from other companies to dress. She began with German bisque head dolls, but soon added celluloid dolls as well as American-made composition, rubber, and even cloth dolls to her lineup. The composition dolls dressed by Vogue were made by Ideal, Arranbee and Madame Alexander.

Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Dora Lee was made from the mid 1930s to 1940s. She is 11″ tall, all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. She is unmarked.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.

Composition Sportswomen doll by Vogue The Sportswomen Series of 14″ dolls includes a Golfer, Tennis Player and Skater in addition to the Skier pictured at left. They are all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips, with lovely mohair wigs and high color faces.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Cynthia was made in 13″ and 18″ sizes. She is all compo and represents a little girl with a chubbier face and body than Dora Lee or the Sportswomen dolls. Some Cynthia dolls have a close mouth and other have an open mouth with teeth.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.

Composition Linda doll by Vogue Composition Linda doll by Vogue 19″ Linda is from the 1940s. She may have been part of a series of three “My Sisters and Me” dolls with 13″ Cynthia and 8″ Me (Toddles) dressed in matching outfits. Like most Vogue composition dolls, her name is stamped on the sole of her shoe.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.

_waacette (2K) _wave2 (5K) WAAC-ette and WAVE-ette were produced during World War II wearing replicas of the official uniforms of the women’s branches of the US military services. The 13″ composition toddler dolls were possibly produced by Ideal and/or Arranbee. Both closed mouth and open mouth dolls were used. They wear cotton dresses underneath cotton coats (navy blue for WAVE-ette and brown for WAAC-ette), matching hats with military insignia, cotton stockings, tie shoes, and shoulder bags with the letters U.S.A.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Toddles doll by Vogue Toddles doll by Vogue

In 1937, Mrs. Graves began buying 8″ composition dolls from R&B. This was Toddles. After a few years she had renowned doll designed Bernard Lipfert sculpt a new version of the doll. Toddles continued to be made until 1948, when the company switched to hard plastic.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

_fgm2 (3K) _fgm1 (3K) This 8″ hard plastic doll was the precursor to Ginny, who became the most popular doll of the 1950s. During this period, the dolls were sold with individual names (pictured at left is Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother) but by the end of 1952, the dolls had become universally known as Ginny. In 1950 the dolls began to be made with sleep eyes.

_nm_brun5 (2K) _nm_lace2 (2K) _nm_ginny1 (3K) In 1952, Ginny began to be sold as a basic doll in her underwear, with outfits available separately. Since Mrs. Graves’ main focus from the beginning had been on Vogue’s beautiful, well made clothing, this was a stroke of genius. Little mothers could now dress their doll for all occasions in everything from day dresses to formal wear to blue jeans. Ginny’s fabulous wardrobe made her the most popular doll of the 1950s.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls



Vogue had produced a baby doll called Velva from 1948 to 1951, with a composition head and stuffed latex rubber body. The doll was discontinued when it became apparent that the latex would begin to deteriorate after a few years, and in any case, the company wanted to concentrate all its resources on Ginny.

Ginnette by Vogue Dolls, Inc. But by 1955 they were ready to add more dolls to the lineup, and Ginnette, an 8″ vinyl baby doll was introduced. She was promoted as “Ginny’s baby sister.” Of course, she had extra fashions too. Ginnette was a popular doll, and like Ginny before her, was copied by many other companies.
Photo courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.

_jillad (4K) _vinyljil (1K) In 1957 the family grew again with the addition of “Ginny’s big sister,” Jill, a 10.5″ high-heeled fashion doll with jointed knees. Like her little sisters, she had clothes for every occasion. The hard plastic version of Jill was made through 1960; then in 1962 and ’63, a vinyl version, called All New Jill (pictured at left) was produced.

_ns_jeff (2K) _ns_jan1 (3K) In 1958 and ’59, Vogue grew Ginny’s family again with the additions of 11″ Jeff and and 10.5″ Jan. Both dolls were all vinyl. Jan was meant to be a friend for Jill, while Jeff could be either Jill’s boyfriend or Ginny’s big brother. They were only made for a couple of years. In 1963-64, a new 12″ version of Jan was made, first called Loveable Jan and then Sweetheart Jan. Those later Jan dolls are much harder to find today.

Ginny Baby was introduced as an 18″ all vinyl baby doll in 1959. Over the years, she was made in several sizes. For a few years in the 1960s, Vogue made an 8″ version that is virtually identical to Ginnette. Ginny Baby was made in both rooted hair and molded hair versions. The boxed doll at left is 16″ tall and dates between 1966 and 1971.

Littlest Angel by Vogue Doll Co. Littlest Angel doll by Vogue In 1958, Vogue purchased the Arranbee Doll Co. and further expanded their line with dolls such as Littlest Angel, who was produced with a vinyl head and hard plastic body beginning in 1961. The doll at left is the later all-vinyl version, made from 1967-74. A third version, available through 1980, has a slightly different face. Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.

Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Brikette was a licensed copy of an Italian doll made by Bonomi. Vogue’s 22″ version was introduced in 1959 and bright orange hair, flirty green eyes and a ball-jointed waist. A year later they introduced a 16″ version who didn’t have the flirty eyes. Platinum blonde and brunette dolls were added to the line as well. She had extra outfits available. The original version of Brikette was made for two years, but was reintroduced in 1979 in a very different version.

Li'l Imp doll by Vogue Li’l Imp is a Littlest Angel doll with orange hair, green eyes and freckles. She was marketed as “Brikette’s kid sister.” She is 11″ tall, with a vinyl head and hard plastic bent-knee walker body. She is marked “R&B” on her head and body.

Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Baby Dear was designed by children’s book illustrator Eloise Wilkin. The original version, produced from 1960-64, is a realistic looking baby with vinyl head and floppy limbs, painted eyes, and a cloth body. She was made in 18″ and 12″ sizes.

Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue In 1964, Baby Dear was redesigned with a new head with sleep eyes. In 1965, she was redesigned again and this final version, pictured at left, was produced until 1980.

Vintage Li'l Dear doll by Vogue The “Dear” line was also expanded with other dolls including Baby Dear One, Too Dear and 8″ Li’l Dear, pictured at left. She has the same head as the smallest version of Ginny Baby, but with the floppy cloth body of Baby Dear.



Mrs. Graves retired in 1960 and her daughter Virginia Carlson took over the company. She in turn retired six years later and her brother-in-law, Edwin Nelson became president of Vogue.

In 1972, Vogue was sold to the Tonka Corporation. They continued to produce Ginny in Far Away Lands outfits, as well as Baby Dear, Littlest Angel and Ginny Baby. They also introduced a few new dolls to the line, including Wash-a-Bye Baby and Precious Baby. Photo of Scotland Ginny courtesy of eBay seller king-auctions.

In 1977, Lesney Products purchased the rights to Vogue’s trademarks from Tonka. One of the lines they produced were the Glitter Girls, 5 1/2″ fashion dolls with extra outfits.



The company changed hands a few more times until it was purchased by the present owners in 1995, and re-launched under the name Vogue Doll Co. Today, the company focuses on Ginny dolls, in classic and contemporary styles, for children as well as collectors. They have introduced a new version of Jill as well. Visit their website at www.voguedolls.com.

If you are interested in learning more about Jill, Jan and Jeff, visit Vicki Broadhurst’s Vogue Jill website.






Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Vogue Dolls
by Judith Izen & Carol Stover
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.



Copyright 2006-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Kim-‘Teen (1957)

 Beehler / Virga  Comments Off on Kim-‘Teen (1957)
Feb 172016
 
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The outfit pictured is for the 8.5″ Kim or Kim-‘Teen doll. She is the same doll as the Virga Hi-Heel ‘Teen. The outfit is stock number HC-102, named “Bridesmaid” and is part of the 100 series. The box end reads “EXCITING ‘TEEN FASHIONS” and “Manufactured by KIM DOLLS 47 West St., New York City”. The outfit includes a simple pink taffeta gown with white overprint, trimmed at the neckline and armholes with pink braid; pink open weave hat with flowers and ribbon; white nylon panties; pink high heel shoes.



Copyright 2000-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Hi-Heel ‘Teen Doll by Virga (1956-7)

 Beehler / Virga  Comments Off on Hi-Heel ‘Teen Doll by Virga (1956-7)
Feb 082016
 
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Body Construction
Virga’s Hi-Heel ‘Teen is one of the tiniest glamour dolls, at only 7.5 inches tall. She is all hard plastic with a synthetic glued-on wig. The dolls were available with various hair colors. Her blue sleep eyes have molded lashes and she has painted lashes above each eye. She is jointed at the neck, shoulders, hips and knees, and is a head-turning walker. The same doll was also sold under the name Kim or Kim Teen.

Markings
She is completely unmarked.

Clothing
Hi-Heel ‘Teen was sold dressed as a bride doll as pictured above. She also had several extra boxed outfits available. The 100 Series included twelve different ensembles. They were sold in boxes like the simpler dresses pictured at the bottom of the page.

Not pictured: #101 Bride: A white-on-white print sleeveless gown with picot edging at the neckline (not the same as the dress the boxed Bride doll was sold in); tulle veil; white heels; white panties; bouquet.

#102 Bridesmaid: Pink taffeta shadow print gown; pink open weave hat; pink heels, bouquet, white panties. This outfit was also sold under the name Kim Teen.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#103 Late Date: Sleeveless dress with black bodice, black and multicolor print flannel skirt; black heels; black hat with red rose; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#104 Special Occasion: Dress with deep pink bodice, multicolor print skirt; white open weave hat; white heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller dreamalong.

#105 Formal: Strapless blue taffeta gown with silver net overskirt; silver net stole; blue heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#106 Calypso: Halter dress with blue bodice, multicolor on white print skirt; yellow molded felt hat; white heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#107 Pajamas: Pink and blue floral print on white taffeta pants; matching top with pink lace yoke and straps; pink heels.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#108 Career: Dress with white Swiss dot short sleeved bodice, black and white print or checked skirt, attached black vinyl belt; white molded felt hat with black ribbon; black heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#109 Shopping: Dress with white long sleeved bodice, multicolor modern print skirt; red molded felt hat; black heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#110 Dude Ranch: Pink and white checked shirt; blue pants with pink and white checked trim; blue molded felt cap; white heels.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#111 Loungers: Red pants; gold and white top with peplum and red trim; red heels.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

#112 Summer Day: White sheer nylon dress with red polka dots, red waistband; white hat with red ribbon; red heels; white panties.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller bopkat.

There was also a series of simpler dresses that had print skirts in a variety of colors, with a solid color felt bodice, no accessories.



Learn More:

cover
Small Dolls
of the 40s & 50s
by Carol Stover
Find it on eBay.
cover
Hard Plastic Dolls
by Polly and Pam Judd
Find it on eBay.
cover
Hard Plastic Dolls II
by Polly and Pam Judd
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2016 by Zendelle Bouchard.

10″ Margot Doll by Alexander (1961)

 Alexander  Comments Off on 10″ Margot Doll by Alexander (1961)
Nov 222015
 
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10″ Margot by Alexander. Photo courtesy of Nancy McKee.

In the 1950’s Madame Alexander used the name Margot for a 14″ ballerina doll with the Margaret face mold. But 1961, the 10″ version of Margot was introduced. She is an all hard plastic glamour doll, the same doll as Cissette, but has an upswept hairdo with a spit curl over her left eye. 10″ Margot is most commonly found as a brunette but blondes were made as well. She has the same dramatic eye paint as Jacqueline. Margot dolls were later used for some of the Portrette series. See a closeup photo of the above doll here. See a back view here.

Margot had several different outfits available. This may not be a complete list.

#? – Silver stretch top (probably came with pants)
#? – Blue and white top with vertical stripes, Mandarin collar, three buttons; orange pants. Sold separately. See photo above.
#? – Pink nylon nightie; black lace peignoir with pink ribbon tie. Sold separately. #905 – Black pants; white eyelet top.
#910 – Black velvet panty; red or yellow satin brocade halter top with gold straps; black elastic-strap heels; pearl drop earrings. See photo at top. This photo shows a variation of the top.
#920 – Purple or lavender satin princess-cut gown with sequined straps; may have matching stole rhinestone or pearl drop earrings; bracelet.
#925 – White satin gown and matching long cape with high collar.
#0965 – Silver lame gown with rhinestone straps, small blue velvet bow at waist. See photo below.
#0970 – Pink pique coat with elbow-length sleeves, trimmed in green rickrack; matching hat. Sold separately. See photo at bottom.

Vintage Margot doll by Madame Alexander.

Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.



Learn More:

cover
Cissette: A Collectors Guide
to the Vintage Alexander Dolls
by Marjorie E. Merod, MD
Find it on eBay.
cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Madame Alexander Dolls 1948-1965
by Linda Crowsey
Find it on eBay.
cover
Madame Alexander Dolls:
An American Legend
by Stephanie Finnegan
Find it on eBay.

Copyright Zendelle Bouchard 2007-2015

Hard Plastic Kewpie Doll by Cameo / Effanbee

 Cameo  Comments Off on Hard Plastic Kewpie Doll by Cameo / Effanbee
Nov 102015
 
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Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

This hard plastic Kewpie doll was sold by Cameo name but was actually manufactured by Effanbee. He is jointed only at the shoulders. He is a rare doll, and hard to track down, because many sellers will describe a hard vinyl doll as “hard plastic” when it is actually not the same material.

The true hard plastic Kewpie doll has little stubby brown painted wings. Only a few of the earliest vinyl Kewpies had wings, so that may make it easier to identify him from photos. He is marked “KEWPIE © Rose O’Neill” on his back. He dates to the 1950s.

His paper label has shifted a little – it should be in the middle of his chest. He measures 9″ tall.

Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.



Learn More:

cover
Collecting Rose
O’Neill’s Kewpies
by David O’Neill &
Janet O’Neill Sullivan
Find it on eBay.
cover
Kewpies:
Dolls & Art
by John Axe
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2015 by Zendelle Bouchard