Apr 242014
 
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With the exception of the basic chemise which came on a doll, the other outfits on this page were all sold separately. Elise also had some coats which came on a dressed doll as part of a complete outfit. Check the Day Dresses and Formal Wear pages.

Please note: The number at the end of the description refers to the source where a photo of the outfit may be found. See legend at bottom of page.

Underwear & Sleepwear

#1600 – 1957 – Basic outfit of lace chemise with straps, ribbon flowers at bodice and at legs; nylon hose; mules trimmed with lace and flowers; drop pearl earrings.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls
#? – 1958 – Pink robe with wide white lace ruffle at neck. Long sleeves gathered at wrists with lace trim.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

#? – 1959 – Petticoat and panties. B&W drawing in #4

#17-25 – 1959 – Sleeveless crepe nightgown with lace bodice. Matches Cissy outfit #22-25. B&W in #1

#17-26 – 1959 – Long-sleeved lace negligee. Matches Cissy outfit #22-26. B&W in #1

#18-25 – 1961 – Double-layered nylon nightgown trimmed in lace; lace bed jacket with ribbon ties. B&W in #1

Outerwear & Accessories

In addition to these
#? – 1958 – White faux fur coat with taffeta lining; matching hood and muff.

#? – 1959 – Wool coat and hat in coral or royal blue with flower accents. B&W drawing in #4

#17-1 – 1959 – Elastic-strap sandals, sold extra. B&W in #1

#17-2 – 1959 – Sling-back sandals decorated with lace and flowers. B&W in #1

#17-10 – 1959 – Flower-trimmed straw hat. B&W in #1

#17-50 – 1959 – Orlon coat with pointed collar, cuffs, flower at neckline; matching hat. Matches Cissy outfit #22-50. B&W in #1

#? – Year? – Black and white houndstooth check swing coat with white collar, red bow at neck. Red hat with black velvet ribbon.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.



Sources for this page include:

  1. “Madame Alexander Catalog Reprints 1942-1962, Vol. 1″ published by Barbara Jo McKeon
  2. “Madame Alexander’s Ladies of Fashion” by Marjorie Sturges Uhl
  3. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls” by Patricia R. Smith
  4. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls: Second Series” by Patricia R. Smith
  5. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls Price Guide #23″ by Linda Crowsey
  6. “Madame Alexander ‘Little People’” by Marge Biggs
  7. “The Golden Age of American Dolls 1945-65″ by Cynthia Gaskill
  8. “Glamour Dolls of the 1950s and 1960s” by Polly and Pam Judd
  9. “American Dolls From The Post-War Era, 1945-1965″ by Florence Theriault
  10. “Patricia Smith’s Doll Values, Antique to Modern, Fifth Series”
  11. “Madame Alexander Catalog Reprints 1963-1972, Vol. 2″ published by Barbara Jo McKeon
  12. “Collector’s Encyclopedia of Madame Alexander Dolls, 1948-65″ by Linda Crowsey

Copyright 1997-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Apr 232014
 
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Elise’s ballerina outfits can be tricky to identify because most of them are very similar with only small changes from year to year.

Please note: Alexander used the same stock numbers repeatedly. The number at the end of the description refers to the source where a photo of the outfit may be found. See legend at bottom of page.

#1635 – 1957 – Pale or deep pink or blue ballerina tutu with attached nylon tulle skirt, satin bodice decorated with flowers has satin ribbon shoulder straps that tie in back; circlet of flowers in hair; pink tights; satin ballet slippers. Some have skirt sprinkled with sequins.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls

#1712 – 1958 – Pink ballerina costume; same as #1635 of 1957.

#1725 – 1958 – Pink ballerina tutu has skirt of multiple layers of nylon tulle, attached satin bodice with ruff of pleated tulle around neckline and floral sash; floral headpiece; nylon tights; satin ballet slippers. B&W in #1, color in #7

#1810 – 1959 – Gold Ballerina outfit with attached full gold net skirt, neckline trimmed with sequins; gold sequined tiara; pink tights; gold ballet slippers; gold earrings. Matches Cissette outfit #713. Color in #2 and #12

#1720 – 1960 – Ballerina tutu of shell pink pleated nylon tulle with satin bodice, decorated with rosebuds and rhinestones; shoulders straps are of tulle and there is a tulle sash gathered at the waist; coronet of flowers; nylon tights; ballet slippers. B&W in #1

#1825 – 1961 – Ballerina tutu with multilayered tulle skirt and taffeta bodice trimmed with flowers; shoulder straps are of tulle; coronet of flowers; tights; ballet slippers. B&W in #1

#1740 – 1962 – Tulle ballerina tutu in blue, pink or white has bodice decorated with sequins, attached tulle skirt sprinkled with rosebuds; pink hose; pink ballet slippers; rhinestone earrings. The blue version has gold sequins with a matching sequined headband; white version has white sequins; pink version has pink sequins and a headband of rosebuds. Color (blue version) in #2 and #6

#1720 – 1963 – Pink or Blue ballerina costume of satin bodysuit; separate pleated tulle tutu skirt with tiny pink roses, blue satin ribbon waistband; headband of pink roses; pale pink tights and ballet slippers; tiny rhinestone earrings.
#? – Year? – Blue tutu has satin bodice, gathered tulle around the armholes but not the neckline; pleated tulle skirt; spray of pink rosebuds hangs from waist and pink rosebuds scattered on skirt; tights and ballet slippers. Sold as an extra outfit.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Sources for this page include:

  1. “Madame Alexander Catalog Reprints 1942-1962, Vol. 1″ published by Barbara Jo McKeon
  2. “Madame Alexander’s Ladies of Fashion” by Marjorie Sturges Uhl
  3. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls” by Patricia R. Smith
  4. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls: Second Series” by Patricia R. Smith
  5. “Madame Alexander Collector’s Dolls Price Guide #23″ by Linda Crowsey
  6. “Madame Alexander ‘Little People’” by Marge Biggs
  7. “The Golden Age of American Dolls 1945-65″ by Cynthia Gaskill
  8. “Glamour Dolls of the 1950s and 1960s” by Polly and Pam Judd
  9. “American Dolls From The Post-War Era, 1945-1965″ by Florence Theriault
  10. “Patricia Smith’s Doll Values, Antique to Modern, Fifth Series”
  11. “Madame Alexander Catalog Reprints 1963-1972, Vol. 2″ published by Barbara Jo McKeon
  12. “Collector’s Encyclopedia of Madame Alexander Dolls, 1948-65″ by Linda Crowsey



Copyright 1997-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Mar 112014
 
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The first face of Elise, 1957-63.

Alexander’s Elise is the sometimes overlooked “middle sister” of their family of glamour dolls. Her sweet charm makes her a favorite of many collectors, however, and while she is most often found as a bride or ballerina, her day dresses and evening gowns are worth the search. Many of her outfits match Cissy and Cissette outfits. In 1958, Elise was sold as “Sweet 16″ in the FAO Schwarz catalog.

The second face of Elise, 1962-64.

Body Construction
The first version of her, manufactured from 1957 to 1963, is 16.5″ tall and hard plastic with vinyl arms. She is jointed at the neck, shoulders, elbows, hips, knees and ankles. She has sleep eyes with brush lashes and a glued-on wig. In 1962, Elise grew to 17″ tall with a vinyl head, although the hard plastic version continued to be produced. In 1962 and ’63, some versions of Elise were made with the pouty Marybel head mold, also in vinyl (see photo below). Elise’s jointed ankles enable her to wear flats, high heels or ballet slippers.

The hard plastic Elise head and body molds were also used for other dolls, including redhead Maggie Mixup in 1961, and Queen Elizabeth II, Scarlett O’Hara and Renoir Portrait in 1963.

Elise disappeared from the catalog in 1965 and returned in 1966 in a redesigned version without the joints at her knees, elbows and ankles. Elise dolls have continued to be produced occasionally throughout the years since.

The third face of Elise, 1962-63.

Markings
Elise is marked “Alexander” on the back of her head, below the hairline, and “Mme. Alexander” on her back.

Clothing
Visit these pages for descriptions and photos of Elise’s clothing:

Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls



Copyright 1999-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Aug 272012
 
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See also:

1950 Hard plastic Cinderella uses the Margaret face mold. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson.

Beatrice Alexander Behrman, or “Madame Alexander,” as she became known,
grew up in the doll business. As the daughter of Maurice Alexander, a Russian immigrant who opened the first doll hospital in this country in 1895, she learned to appreciate the beauty of dolls from her early years. Her father’s teachings stayed with her into adulthood, and seeking a professional and artistic challenge, she founded the Alexander Doll Co., Inc., in the 1920′s. She went on to become the leading lady of the doll industry as she guided a company famous for the beauty and high quality of its dolls and their clothing.

Early Alexander dolls were cloth and composition. They had big hits in the 1930′s with their licensed Dionne Quintuplets and Sonja Henie composition dolls. During this period they also introduced characters from literature, including the Little Women series and McGuffey Ana. In the late ’40s, they turned to hard plastic and their Margaret and Maggie face dolls were the epitome of the well-dressed little girl. The 8″ Alexander-kins were introduced in 1953. Baby dolls such as Little Genius were produced in several sizes.

From the very beginning, Madame Alexander focused on producing the highest quality, most beautiful doll clothing in the world. The same molds were used over and over again, with the costume and hairstyling creating the character of the doll.

Alexander initiated the modern era of the fashion doll with the introduction of Cissy in 1955. In the company’s catalog for that year, Madame describes her as “A Child’s Dream Come True.” Elise, a doll with jointed ankles to enable her to wear low or high heels, was introduced in 1957, and in 1959, 10″ Cissette joined her “big sisters” as Alexander’s newest fashionable lady. All of these dolls had extensive lines of extra clothing and accessories which could be purchased.

In addition to the fashionable ladies, Alexander produced some of their most enduring child dolls in the 1950s. Baby Kathy was produced in several sizes, and little girl Kelly was dressed in beautiful, classic styles. The Little Women dolls that had always been big sellers for Alexander got an update with the introduction of pre-teen Lissy.


Marybel, the Doll Who Gets Well by Madame Alexander

Marybel, the Doll Who Gets Well utilized the Kelly face. Scan from 1963 Sears Toy Book.

In the 1960s, Alexander introduced a number of new dolls with unique head molds, including Brenda Starr, a slim teen fashion doll to compete with Mattel’s Barbie, and Coco, a new 20″ high fashion doll. While these dolls had a fairly short production run, the company also introduced some new faces which would become classics in their line. The 21″ Jacqueline doll was one of these. Initially a representation of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, the mold was later used for the Portrait Series of lady dolls which were produced for decades. 14″ Mary Ann and 12″ Janie, both little girl dolls, became mainstays of the company’s line as well.

Also in the 1960s, the International Series using the 8″ Alexander-kins molds were introduced. They have become Alexander’s most popular line, and are still being manufactured today.


Netherlands Boy and Girl by Madame Alexander

8″ Netherlands Girl and Boy, 1980s.

The 1970s and ’80s saw Alexander staying the course, with few innovations, producing the beloved babies and children, characters from classic literature, and ladies in Portrait gowns that had always done well for them. After Madame’s death in 1990, the company went through a challenging period. They were the last of the major doll manufacturers still located in the United States, and having difficulty competing for collectors’ dollars. In 1995 the company was sold to an international banking group and production began to be moved overseas.

Today the Alexander Doll Company is going strong, producing high-quality play dolls for children, and several lines for collectors, as well as reproductions of their best-loved dolls of yesteryear.

See also:



Copyright 2012-14 by Zendelle Bouchard