Sep 062013
 
Share

See also:
Cissette’s Outfits 1957-58
and
Cissette’s Outfits 1959-63


Two basic Cissette dolls from different years – the blonde is stock #700; the redhead is #900. Click on a small photo to see a larger version.
_700a (2K) _700c (2K) _700d (4K) _900a (2K) _900c (4K)
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Cissette arrived two years after Cissy as the smaller, cuter and more affordable version of Alexander’s popular glamour doll. The same mold was also used for other dolls during the Cissette period, including Sleeping Beauty (identifiable by her flat feet), Margot (with heavy eye makeup and upswept hair) and Jacqueline (heavy eye makeup and sidepart hairstyle). The mold continued to be used for the Portrette series and other dolls in the ’60s, and is still in use today. Cissette was reintroduced for collectors in the late ’90s.

Body Construction
Cissette is all hard plastic, jointed at the neck, shoulders, hips and knees, with high heel feet. She has sleep eyes with molded lashes, with painted lashes underneath, one-stroke eyebrows, and pierced ears. Her synthetic wig is styled in a curly flip with bangs, and was available in blonde, brunette or redhead. A few fancy dressed dolls came with upswept hairdos. A rare version of Cissette from the early ’60s had a bald head with interchangeable wigs.

Identifying Cissette
Trying to date a Cissette doll can be challenging. Here are some clues:
Eyelids: 1957 dolls have beige eyelids, in 1958 they were pale pink and thereafter were peach.
Wigs: 1957 and ’58 wigs were made with three rows of stitching; after that they used zigzag stitching. A few fancy wigs had three rows on some later dolls.
Fingernails: had polish starting sometime in 1961.
Eye weights: dolls from 1957 and part of ’58 had heavy weights on their sleep eyes. Smaller weights were used thereafter.
Clothing: Dresses in 1957 and ’58 had bodice darts; in 1959, they did not. Thereafter bodice darts were only used for evening wear.

_cetteslip1 (2K) _cetteslip2 (3K) _cetteslip3 (3K)
Clothing
Cissette was sold as a dressed doll or in a basic chemise or slip. Like her big sister Cissy, she often wore royal outfits and wedding gowns, but day dresses and ballet costumes were common as well. Many of her outfits matched Cissy and Elise clothing. See the Outfits 1957-58 and Outfits 1959-63 pages for more information.

Copyright 2006-13 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Sep 052013
 
Share

Madame Alexander made dolls in composition from the mid-1930s until they switched to hard plastic in 1948. As they later did in hard plastic and vinyl, the most popular face molds were used over and over again with only painted features, hairstyle and clothing to differentiate them. Some dolls, like Jane Withers and the Three Little Pigs, had unique molds. Many of the classic Alexander dolls have been reissued in vinyl in recent years.

Jump to individual dolls on this page:
Alice in Wonderland
Baby Genius
Baby McGuffey
Betty
Carmen
Dionne Quintuplets
Jeannie Walker
Little Betty
Madelaine DuBain
Fairy Princess
Sonja Henie
Karen
Lady Windermere
McGuffey Ana
Margaret O’Brien
Princess Elizabeth
Princess Margaret Rose
Scarlett
Scarlett Portrait
Three Little Pigs
Tiny Betty
Wendy Ann
Wendy Ann – molded hair
Wendy Ann – painted eyes
Jane Withers

Click on a small photo to view a larger version. This is just a small sampling of Alexander’s compo dolls.

Princess Elizabeth face:

Princess Elizabeth doll by Alexander Princess Elizabeth doll by Alexander Elizabeth II has been made in doll form by several different companies, beginning in 1937 when she was a Princess and continuing through her coronation in 1953 until today. Pictured at left are two 1938 composition Princess Elizabeth toddler dolls by Alexander. The same face mold was used for other dolls as well. Find Princess Elizabeth dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_24mcguff1 (2K) _mcguff1 (2K) _mcguff2 (4K) McGuffey Ana has been a popular character for Alexander for decades. This version, using the Princess Elizabeth face mold, was made from 1937-44. She was sold in a variety of outfits but always had her hair in braids. Find McGuffey Ana dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Wendy Ann face:

_molded (2K) _molded2 (4K) Most Wendy Ann dolls have wigs, but this early version has molded hair.
Find Wendy Ann dolls on eBay.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls


_12alice1 (3K) Alice in Wonderland was one of the many story book characters that Alexander has made. This version is 12″ tall.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_12wend1 (2K) _14wann1 (3K) _15wendyann (3K) Here are three dolls that were sold under the Wendy Ann name. The name was taken from Madame Alexander’s granddaughter.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_14fairyprin (3K) _15fairyp (3K) Here are two different versions of the Fairy Princess.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_14madeleine (3K) _dubain3 (4K) Madelaine DuBain was sold in several sizes and various outfits from 1937-41. Later, she was made in hard plastic using the Maggie face.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_18scarlett (3K) Scarlett has been a perennially popular character in the Alexander lineup. This version is 18″ tall.
Find composition Scarlett dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_carmen1 (3K) Carmen capitalized on the popularity of singer/actress Carmen Miranda.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_scarlett1 (4K) _scarlett3 (4K) _ladywind1 (4K)

Portraits were made before and after World War II and had striking facial paint. Left to right are Scarlett and Lady Windermere. They are 21″ tall and were very expensive dolls at the time.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Margaret face:

Margaret O'Brien doll by Madame Alexander Margaret O'Brien doll by Madame Alexander Margaret O'Brien doll by Madame Alexander Margaret O’Brien was a child movie star in the 1940s. Alexander made her in composition in 1946-7 (shown at left), and in a hard plastic version in 1948.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_mrose1 (2K) _mrose3 (4K) Princess Margaret Rose was the younger sister of Britain’s Queen Elizabeth. In the late ’30s, Alexander made her as a toddler doll with the Princess Elizabeth face; this more grown up version with the Margaret face dates from 1946.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_karen1 (3K) _karen2 (4K) Karen Ballerina was made in 15″ and 18″ sizes from 1946-49. She was made in hard plastic as well.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Tiny Betty/Little Betty face:

Composition Little Betty as Bo-Peep doll by Madame Alexander _tiny2 (4K) 7″ Tiny Betty was sold under many different character names and in many different regional outfits from 1935-42. At far left is Bo-Peep.
Find Tiny Betty dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Little Betty composition doll by Madame Alexander 9″ Little Betty was just a slightly bigger version of Tiny Betty. She is pictured here dressed as a Scottish lass.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.


_peye1 (3K) _peye2 (6K) This doll made with the Little Betty face was the first use of the name Wendy Ann.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Baby faces:

_12bgen1 (2K) _12bgen2 (3K)

Baby Genius was made in cloth, composition and hard plastic versions over many years. Compo dolls like the one pictured had cloth bodies and were made in the 1930s and ’40s.
Find Little Genius dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc. Visit their website.


_17babymcguff (2K) Baby McGuffey. Most dolls with the McGuffey name are toddlers or little girls, but this rare doll has bent baby legs. She is 17″ tall and was made in 1937 only.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

This 21″ doll might be either Baby Genius or Baby McGuffey. Without a box or tag, it is difficult to tell. Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Unique Celebrity faces:

Composition Marie Dionne doll by Alexander Composition Dionne Quintuplet dolls by Alexander The Dionne Quintuplets were the first surviving set of identical quintuplets in history. Their birth in Canada in 1934 was a media sensation. Alexander acquired the rights to make dolls of them, which they did in several different baby and toddler versions from 1935-39. The smaller sizes were usually sold as sets of five dolls. Many other doll companies made unlicensed versions of the Dionnes.
Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.


_15withers1 (2K) _15withers2 (4K) Jane Withers was a child star in the 1930s. She was made by Alexander in several sizes from 1937-39. Some were all composition (like the 15″ doll pictured) and some had a compo head and limbs on a cloth body.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_15orange1 (2K) _15orange2 (3K) Sonja Henie was a Norwegian ice skater who won the Olympic gold medal in 1928, 1932 and 1936. When she retired from competition, she had a second career in the movies. Alexander made Sonja Henie in composition from 1939-42 (shown at left) and in a totally different version with vinyl head and hard plastic body in 1951.
Find Sonja Henie dolls on eBay.
Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc. Visit their website.

Other Unique faces:

Composition Jeannie Walker doll by Alexander 14″ Jeannie Walker has a unique construction with a walking mechanism. The doll’s crotch piece is made of wood. She was produced in the early 1940s.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller hug*a*pug.


_pig1 (2K) _pig2 (2K) _pig3 (2K) Three Little Pigs and Wolf dolls were sold in 1938-39. Each pig had a different outfit. They have been reissued in vinyl in recent years.


_12betty (3K) The Betty with molded hair (far left), was made by another company and dressed and sold by Alexander. She dates from the early to mid 1930s. This doll is 12″ tall. The Betty doll on the near left was manufactured by Alexander. She has sleep eyes and what looks like a caracul wig, and was made in 13″, 17″ and 22″ sizes. Photo of wigged Betty courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Copyright 2009-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard