Mar 082016
 
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Dee an Cee’s 17″ Cindy was sold in the late 1950s in a variety of outfits, including a bridal gown.

Dee an Cee was a Canadian doll manufacturer from 1938 to 1964. The name was derived from the first letters of the last names of the two founders, Max Diamond and Morris Cone. The company motto was “Quality above all”.

This all original doll was received as a Christmas gift in 1939. She is 19 1/2″ tall, full composition with sleep eyes, open mouth with two teeth, Jointed at neck, shoulders and hips.

Through the 1940s, the company made composition dolls, mostly babies, including Snuggles, Sweetums and Little Darling. They briefly experimented with rubber dolls before switching over to vinyl beginning in 1949.

Many of the their products were licensed from U.S. companies and made from the original molds. They held the Canadian licenses to produce Mattel’s Chatty Cathy and Alexander’s Marybel. Sometimes the dolls names were changed; American Character’s Baby Dear was sold by Dee an Cee as Dream Baby, while Mattel’s Scooba-Doo became Kookie in Canada.
The company produced their own original dolls too. Mandy and Dusty, designed by Morris Cone, were black brother and sister dolls with realistic features and molded hair, first produced in 1956.

Dee an Cee was the first Canadian doll company to advertise on television. After the firm was sold to Mattel in 1962, manufacturing in Canada was gradually discontinued. The name was no longer used after 1964.

Dee an Cee dolls show a variety of markings, including D&C, Dee an Cee, Dee and Cee, and DEE & CEE.

Visit these pages to learn more about Dee an Cee dolls:

 


Copyright 2000-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Composition Scootles Doll by Cameo Doll Co.

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Sep 042015
 
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All composition Scootles doll designed by Rose O’Neill and made by Cameo Doll Company.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Scootles started out as a character in the Kewpie stories written and illustrated by Rose O’Neill. She is the “baby tourist” who visits the Kewpies in Kewpieville, but Scootles is much better known in doll form.

Scootles has a beautifully modeled baby face with an impish expression.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Scootles has been made in several different materials. All-bisque versions were made in Germany and Japan in the 1920s. A cloth Scootles with a painted mask face and yarn hair was made by Richard Krueger in the 1930s. The composition versions by Cameo were produced in the 1930s and ’40s. They sold Scootles in vinyl in the 1960s, and Cameo’s successor, Jesco, continued making them in the ’80s and 90s. Most recently, Scootles has been made in felt by R. John Wright.

All original black Scootles doll by Cameo.
Photo courtesy of Martin Auction Co.

Body Construction
Composition Scootles has molded hair in curls, and usually has painted side-glancing eyes, although dolls with centered eyes and sleep eyes were also sold. She was made in seven sizes from 7.5″ to 20″. A black version was made as well. She is jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips.

This Scootles doll has less common centered eyes.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Markings
Composition Scootles dolls are completely unmarked.

Clothing
Scootles came dressed in a cotton sunsuit, socks and oilcloth shoes.

All original Scootles doll by Cameo.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Packaging
Scootles came packaged in a box with a picture of a Kewpie doll on the front like the one pictured on the Kewpie page. On the end of the box, she was identified as Scootles Doll of Kewpieville. She has a gold hang tag that identifies her as a Rose O’Neill creation.

See also:



Learn More:

cover
Kewpies:
Dolls & Art
by John Axe
Find it on eBay.
cover
With Kewpish Love
by Florence Theriault
Find it on eBay.
cover
Collecting Rose
O’Neill’s Kewpies
by David O’Neill &
Janet O’Neill Sullivan
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2015 by Zendelle Bouchard

Arranbee Doll Company (R&B)

 Arranbee  Comments Off on Arranbee Doll Company (R&B)
Aug 012012
 
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Hard plastic Nanette and Nancy Lee dolls by Arranbee.

Arranbee Doll Co. was founded in 1919 in New York City. In the early years of the company, they imported bisque head dolls from Armand Marseille and Simon & Halbig in Germany. They also sold all-bisque dolls and composition mama dolls, as well as doll hospital supplies including wigs, parts, and shoes. In 1925, they opened their own factory in New York manufacturing composition dolls. They kept up with changes in the industry, switching to hard plastic in the ’40s and vinyl in the ’50s. The company made many of its own dolls, but also purchased dolls from other manufacturers to dress and market under their own name. While not being ground-breakingly original, Arranbee dolls are noted for their beauty and high quality, both in the dolls and their clothing. Company founder and president William Rothstein died unexpectedly in 1957; his family continued the firm for a short while, then sold it to the Vogue Doll Co. Vogue continued the Arranbee name and some of the lines until 1961. Fortunately for collectors, many Arranbee dolls are marked. Here are some of their more notable dolls:

  • Dream Baby or My Dream Baby was the first of Arranbee’s dolls to have a name. There is a closed-mouth version (A.M. mold number 341) and an open-mouth version (mold number 351). Some dolls have stuffed cloth bodies with compo or rubber hands, while others have full jointed compo bodies. After the company started making their own composition dolls, they continued using the Dream Baby name. There is a wide variety of compo Dream Babies, including dolls with painted eyes or sleep eyes, molded hair or mohair wigs, in a range of sizes. Dream Baby continued into the ’50s in a hard plastic version.
  • Composition version of Arranbee’s Dream Baby doll.

  • Nancy was first made in composition starting in 1931. A few different head molds were used for this molded hair Patsy-type doll (complete with bent right arm) who ranged from 11″ to 14″ in height. Nancy was also made in a line of 16″ to 20″ chubbier toddler dolls with sleep eyes and mohair wigs.
  • Debu’teen was introduced in 1938. She represented a young teenage girl, with a slim body and a wistful expression, and was made in sizes from 13″ to 22″. Larger dolls have a compo socket head on a shoulder plate, with cloth torso and compo limbs, while the smaller dolls are all composition. She was sold in a wide variety of well-made outfits including school clothes, dressy clothes, sporting outfits and military uniforms. The Sporting Women series of dolls by Vogue greatly resemble Debu’teen, and were probably made by Arranbee for Vogue in an unmarked version.
  • Around the World and Storybook dolls from the late ’30s and early ’40s are 9″ all-composition characters with molded hair and painted eyes. The same doll was used for both boy and girl characters, such as Snow White, Pirate, Dutch Boy and Girl, etc.
  • Nannette is a composition and cloth mama doll with swing legs. She was sold from 1937 until 1943, when the spelling of her name was changed to Nanette. She was sold until about 1947, when the company switched production to hard plastic dolls. The hard plastic version of Nanette is a little girl doll, virtually indistinguishable from Nancy Lee. In the fifties, Nanette was made with a vinyl head and hard plastic body. The last version of Nanette was an 18″ all vinyl high-heeled glamour doll.
  • Nancy Lee was a true little girl doll. She did not have the chubbiness of the Nancy and Nannette toddlers, but she was not quite as slim as Debu’teen. The compo version, who made her debut in 1943, generally has smoky eye shadow. The hard plastic version was sold from the late ’40s into the late ’50s.
  • 12″ Little Angel and 10″ Littlest Angel are toddler fashion dolls. Many extra outfits were available for them. Little Angel was not as popular as her smaller sibling, and was discontinued in 1955. Littlest Angel was later made with jointed knees, and starting in 1956 had a vinyl head with rooted hair. Littlest Angel was one of the dolls that Vogue continued to sell under the R&B name after they bought the company.
  • Coty Girl was a 10″ vinyl glamour doll made to compete with Ideal’s Little Miss Revlon. She had many extra outfits and was advertised extensively. This doll is very difficult to identify because she is marked only with a P in a circle, as were many other small glamour dolls of the era. The 18″ Coty Girl is the same doll as the high-heeled Nanette (see photo below).

Learn More:

cover
Arranbee Dolls
by Suzanne L. DeMillar
and Dennis J. Brevik
Find it on eBay.
cover
Dolls & Accessories of the 1950s
by Dian Zillner
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2006-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard.