Dec 082012
 
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12" vinyl Shirley Temple doll by Ideal Toy Corp.

This 1958 12″ vinyl Shirley Temple doll with extra outfits was sold in a box resembling a TV set, tying in to Shirley Temple Black’s children’s television show.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

17" vinyl Shirley Temple doll by Ideal Toy Corp.

17″ vinyl Shirley Temple doll wears a cotton dress which may have been a Sears exclusive. This size was made from 1959 to 1963.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Ideal made their first vinyl versions of the Shirley Temple doll from 1958-63. They had rooted blonde hair with Shirley’s famous curls and hazel sleep eyes. Some of the larger dolls had “twinkle eyes,” also known as flirty eyes, which could move from side to side as well as open and close. The 12″ version had lots of extra clothes that could be purchased; the 15″, 17″, 19″ and very rare 26″ sizes were sold in a variety of outfits but no clothing was sold separately. Most of these outfits were not from Shirley’s movies, but reflected typical little girl fashions of the period. 1950s Shirley Temple dolls came wearing a plastic pin of her name in script. The 15″ version was reissued in 1972 as a Montgomery Ward exclusive.

15" vinyl reissue Shirley Temple doll by Ideal Toy Corp.

15″ vinyl Shirley Temple doll reissued in 1972 for Montgomery Ward was available in this outfit only.
Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out her eBay listings.

The Shirley Temple Playpal doll sold only in 1960 is 36″ tall and has the same blow-molded jointed vinyl body as Patti Playpal, with a Shirley Temple head. She most often wears a nylon dress but was also available in a Heidi outfit.

In 1973, a new 16.5″ vinyl version of the Shirley Temple doll was sold wearing her red and white polka dotted “Stand Up and Cheer” outfit. There were four additional outfits sold separately. This doll was available through 1975.

In 1982-3, Ideal made 8″ and 12″ versions of Shirley Temple with pale vinyl resembling porcelain. With this Collector’s Edition series, they returned to dressing Shirley in outfits from her 1930’s film roles. In 1984-5, a 16″ Shirley was made, available in three different costumes.

1984 16" vinyl Shirley Temple doll by Ideal Toy Corp.

16″ vinyl Shirley Temple doll, the final version made by Ideal, wearing outfit from her 1934 film “Stand Up and Cheer!”







Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Nov 122012
 
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Kenner Products was founded in 1947 by the Steiner brothers in Cincinnati, Ohio, and quickly became successful with their toys. Their success continued through the fifties and sixties, with introductions like the Easy Bake Oven and Spirograph. The company was purchased by General Mills in 1967. In the ’70s, Kenner got into the doll business. They continued to make dolls throughout the decade, but by the 1980’s were concentrating more on action figures, including the Star Wars line, which was their biggest success story. In 1985, General Mills spun off Kenner and Parker Brothers into a new company, called Kenner Parker Toys. Two years later it was acquired by the Tonka Corporation, which split Kenner Products and Parker Brothers back into separate divisions. In 1991, Kenner became part of the world’s largest toy company when Tonka was purchased by Hasbro. They continued to produce high quality dolls during this period. In 2000, Hasbro shut down the Kenner division and merged its product lines together. Although they still produce some of Kenner’s products, including Baby Alive, the Kenner name is no longer used.

These are some of the dolls and action figures made by Kenner. Click on a photo to see a larger version.

Gabbigale is an 18″ talking doll with a battery-operated recording mechanism. When you raise her arm, pull the string and talk to her, she records what you say. When you lower her arm and pull the string, she repeats it back to you. Copyright 1972.
Photo courtesy of Martin Auction Co.

Baby Alive was hugely successful for Kenner. While there are many drink-and-wet baby dolls, Baby Alive is the rare “eat-and-poop” model. She is battery operated with a chewing mechanism. She was sold throughout the ’70s and a new version was produced in 1990. There were both black and white models made. Baby Alive is still being made in an updated version by Hasbro.

Crumpet, copyrighted in 1970, is a 19″ pullstring, battery operated mechanical doll who pours tea and serves cookies. She has long straight blonde hair and blue sleep eyes, and was sold complete with her table and tea set.

Madcap Molly, advertised in 1971, is an unusual wind-up walking doll described as “the do-it-all dolly.” She is 12″ tall and came packaged with a shopping cart, scooter and skis. Molly’s construction is hard to describe: her head, arms and legs are flat plastic while her torso is more three-dimensional.

Garden Gal is a series of three dolls: blonde Skye, Brunette Meadow, and Willow, a redhead. They came packaged with flower seeds, two plastic pots, peat discs and watering can. The dolls, from 1972, have white molded boots on their feet.

Betty Crocker was a lithographed cloth advertising doll sold with baking utensils. She is 13″ tall with huge brown eyes, and her gingham dress and white apron with the Betty Crocker logo are removable. She has brown yarn pigtails in addition to her fabric hair. Dated 1974.

Vintage Blythe doll by Kenner Vintage Blythe doll by Kenner Blythe was introduced in 1972. She is a very unusual 11″ fashion doll with an oversized hard plastic head. By pulling the string at the back of her head, her eyes will close, and reopen a different color! Her eyes can be blue, green, brown and pink by turns. Blythe came with a variety of hair colors, either with bangs or in a side part style. Her vinyl body is the same or similar to that used for Hasbro’s World of Love dolls. Many extra outfits were sold for Blythe, and there were wigs in wild colors available too. In the past few years Blythe has become very popular, particularly with Japanese collectors, and Blythe dolls have been reproduced by Ashton-Drake and by Takara in Japan.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.
Vintage Blythe doll by Kenner Vintage Blythe doll by Kenner

Vintage Jenny Jones & Baby John dolls by Kenner Jenny Jones and Baby John are a mother and baby set of dolls produced in 1973. Jenny is 9″ tall and her drink-and-wet baby is 2.5″. They were sold with a crib and accessories. There were also separate outfits and nursery furniture available for them.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Vintage Dusty doll by Kenner Vintage Dusty doll by Kenner Dusty has been called one of the ugliest fashion dolls ever made. While this may be unfair, it’s safe to say that she is not a “girly” doll. Her niche was that she was an active sports-minded girl, busy with tennis, golf, skiing, swimming and other fun activities. Dusty has platinum blonde hair in a shag cut, a tan complexion and a big smile. She is 11.5″ tall and jointed at the waist. Most dolls have bendable arms and jointed wrists, but there were some dolls made with straight arms. These were sold for $1.99 with the trade-in of any old doll. Dusty had separate outfits available for many different sports. She also had a black friend named Skye. While Dusty and Skye are the same height as Mattel’s Barbie, they have a stockier build, and Barbie’s clothes will not fit them.
Vintage Dusty and Skye dolls by Kenner
Vintage Dusty and Skye dolls by Kenner

Nancy Nonsense is an 18″ pullstring talking doll from 1974. She has blonde hair in pigtails and painted blue eyes with lashes.

Baby Yawnie is a 14″ baby doll from 1974 with a stuffed cloth body; when you squeeze her hand she yawns and closes her eyes by means of a bellows mechanism. Black and white versions were made.

Steve Scout (white doll) and Bob Scout (black doll) from 1974 are 9″ action figures that wear official Boy Scouts of American uniforms. There were several Adventure Sets and accessories sold for them.
Photo courtesy of Martin Auction Co.

Vintage Bionic Woman doll by Kenner The Six Million Dollar Man, and The Bionic Woman were popular TV shows in the ’70s, and Kenner’s dolls of the main characters, Steve Austin played by Lee Majors, and Jaime Summers, played by Lindsay Wagner, were big hits. The company also produced dolls of Oscar Goldman (Steve Austin’s boss), Maskatron (his robot enemy) and Fembot (Jaime Summer’s robot enemy), as well as playsets and extra outfits for Steve and Jaime.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Stretch Armstrong doll by Kenner Stretch Armstrong doll by Kenner Stretch Armstrong is unique. He is 15″ tall, but has a latex rubber body that can be stretched to several times its size. Inside is a gel made from corn syrup that helps keep the stretched-out shape for a short time. He was first issued in 1976, but was reissued in the ’90s with his dog, Fetch.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

1977 Star Wars Chewbacca action figure by Kenner Vintage Star Wars 1977 Stormtrooper action figure by Kenner Kenner had the first license to make Star Wars action figures, which they did from 1977 to 1985, and in doing so, popularized the 3.75″ figure which became an industry standard. They made over 100 unique figures and sold more than 300 million of them worldwide. Pictured at left are the Stormtrooper and Chewbacca from 1977.

Photos courtesy of eBay seller king-auctions.

Vintage Darci doll by Kenner Vintage Darci doll by Kenner Darci is a 12.5″ fashion doll from the late ’70s with a fashion model theme. She had two friends, Dana and Erica, and many extra outfits. Although Darci is beautiful and well-made, the fact that she couldn’t share clothes with Mattel’s more popular Barbie doll, spelled her doom. Darci was made as a blonde, brunette and redhead. She has jointed wrists, which are unusual in a doll of this size.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.
Vintage Darci doll outfit by Kenner Vintage Darci doll Perfect Pose Studio by Kenner

An International Velvet doll was produced in 1979 as a tie-in to the movie starring Tatum O’Neal. Ms. O’Neal is pictured on the box, but her name is not mentioned and the doll doesn’t resemble her. The doll wears white riding breeches and an ascot, with a black jacket, boots and hat. She is 11″ tall with long blonde hair.

The Sea Wees are 4″ mermaid dolls with a copyright date of 1979. They have one piece bodies, jointed only at the neck, and long rooted hair. Pets and babies were made for them.

Vintage Strawberry Shortcake doll by Kenner Vintage Strawberry Shortcake doll outfits by Kenner Strawberry Shortcake and her many friends have been made by a few different companies under license from American Greetings. The first doll versions were made by Kenner in the 1980s. The most common are 5.5″ vinyl scented dolls. They had extra outfits and accessories. A 16″ rag doll version was made as well. She has yarn hair and her bonnet is attached to her head. In the ’90s Strawberry Shortcake was made by Toy Headquarters, Inc. The line is now produced by Hasbro.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.
Butter Cookie doll by Kenner Vintage Baby Strawberry Shortcake doll by Kenner

Vintage Glamour Gals Loni doll by Kenner Glamour Gals is a series of 4″ fashion dolls with non-removable clothing, made in the early 1980s. There were several different dolls sold in a variety of outfits. In addition to the regular line, there was also a line of dolls wearing jewelry, and a line that came with accessories. They also had a Showplace Case, a car, and even a cruise ship.

Photo courtesy of eBay seller king-auctions.

Vintage Indiana Jones doll by Kenner Vintage Raiders of the Lost Ark Belloq action figure by Kenner After the movie “Raiders of the Lost Ark” came out, Kenner had the first license to make tie-in toys. This Indiana Jones doll is 12″ tall. He can be considered a celebrity doll as well, because the box features a photo of actor Harrison Ford. They also made a line of 3.75″ action figures which included several characters from the film, including Belloq, pictured at left.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Rose Petal Place dolls, made in the mid-80s, are 6″ doll with a fantasy flower theme.

Hugga Bunch, copyright 1985, was a strange line of plush toddler dolls, like a cross between a doll and a stuffed animal. They came with smaller baby dolls for them to hug.

Always Sisters doll outfit by Kenner Always Sisters dolls by Kenner Always Sisters are three families of three sisters each. There is a blonde family, a brunette family and a redhead family, with each having a 14″ baby sister, an 18″ middle sister and a 22″ oldest sister. They have vinyl heads and hands with cloth covered posable bodies. Each doll was sold separately, and they had extra outfits.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller dreamalong.

Special Blessings from 1988 are a line of Christian-themed dolls with hands in praying position. They have vinyl heads, soft cloth bodies and big painted eyes that glance upward.

Hey Vern It’s Ernest! is a talking doll Kenner made in 1989, in the likeness of fictional character Ernest P. Worrell, as portrayed by actor Jim Varney. Ernest’s career began in television commercials, then he got his own series and starred in several feature films as well. The doll is 16″ tall and is a pull string talker.

A talking Beetlejuice doll was made that same year, in the likeness of actor Michael Keaton.

Sabrina, the Teenage Witch was a 1990s tie-in to the popular TV show starring Melissa Joan Hart. She is a 10″ fashion-type doll, and was sold along with her cat, a rabbit and hat, and book of magic spells. There was also a Bedtime Sabrina, who according to the packaging, could “magically levitate” from her bed.

Babysitters Club, from 1993, is a line of 18″ dolls that tied in to the popular series of chapter books for girls.

Copyright 2006-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

Nov 052012
 
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Swingtime doll by Jolly Toys

Swingtime doll by Jolly Toys.

Photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

Little information is available on this company. They made a variety of vinyl dolls, including high-heeled glamour dolls, babies and toddlers, starting about 1960, and continuing into the ’70s. The company apparently had some business arrangement with Nasco as well as Jolly, as dolls marked “Kaysam” have been found in Jolly and Nasco boxes.

Click on a small photo to view a larger version.

Swingtime (pictured above) is a 16″ vinyl toddler with rooted brown hair wearing an eyelet dress. She comes packaged in a 26″ tall red and yellow plastic swing set.

Glamour doll by Kaysam Kaysam glamour dolls were made in 15″, 20″ and 24″ sizes. They have a unique face that is easily recognizable once you have seen a few of them, with a long neck. They have a slim body which is more like Mattel’s Barbie than like other glamour dolls their size. Learn more about the doll pictured at left here. Photo courtesy of Sheryl Schmidt.

Hello Dolly (1964) is a 20″ high-heeled adult figured glamour doll. She has variegated strawberry blonde hair, and wears a long slim gown with a design of flocked glitter on the front panel, and a feathered headband. She is meant to look as Carol Channing did in the Broadway show; but it is not a portrait of the star. A regular doll from the line was used, marked 1961. There was also a Barbie-sized version of this doll, but she was made by Allied-Grand.
Doll in blue taffeta dress by Jolly Toys The glamour dolls marketed under the Jolly Toys name look more like Ideal’s Revlon doll and other late fifties high heeled dolls. Learn more about this doll here.

Vintage Judy baby doll by Kaysam Judy is an 11″ all vinyl bent leg baby doll. 1963.

Vintage Jean doll by Kaysam Jean is an 11.5″ toddler, who appears to have been made with the same head as Judy. 1963.

Robin is a toddler doll with straight platinum blonde hair with bangs. She wears a white jumper with red, white and blue striped blouse, white socks and red shoes. Her box is red, white and blue striped to match.

Vintage Kaysam 16 inch Nurse doll Vintage Kaysam 16 Vintage Kaysam 16 This 16″ Nurse came packaged in a gift set with a nurse’s bag, hypodermic needle (way out of scale) and bandaids, plus a cocktail dress and stole with corsage. The same doll was also sold in a different gift set wearing a pants outfit. 1963.

Cutie-Pie is another platinum blonde toddler.

Jinx is a knockoff of Vogue’s Brikette doll. She is 21″ tall with carrot red or black hair and a watermelon smile.

Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad dolls by Jolly Toys Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad dolls hang tag by Jolly Toys Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad were made as advertising tie-ins to Swiss Miss Cocoa. They are each 14″ tall. Swiss Miss is marked “Jolly Toys Inc. 1962″. A cloth Swiss Miss doll was produced in 1978, but probably by a different company. Photos courtesy of eBay seller myoldkentuckyhome.

Pride is a 6.5″ (Dawn-sized) fashion doll with long straight hair, who came packaged with an outfit. Packages containing two outfits (no doll) were also sold separately.

Grandma is 20″ tall, with a high-heeled glamour body, but an older lady’s face with gray hair. She has been found in Jolly marked boxes as well as Royal boxes, with the name Grannykins. These companies may have been related. A very rare Grandpa doll was made as well. For more info, go to the Grandma page.

Nikki is 12″ tall, platinum blonde and has an unusual expression with a puckered mouth. She looks like she is about to say something. She was sold in various outfits and hairstyles.

Golden Book Dolls is a series of dolls representing characters from Little Golden Books, each doll was packaged together with a book. Heidi is 14″ tall with blonde hair and a Swiss style outfit similar to that worn by Swiss Miss but with golden lacing on the front of the vest, and her blue skirt is a plain, not print fabric. Other dolls in the series were Hansel and Gretel (sold separately), Cinderella, Nurse Nancy, Little Red Riding Hood and My Dolly and Me.

12″ Bride doll has dark brunette hair and has painted side-glancing eyes. She somewhat resembles Horsman’s Mary Poppins doll. She wears a satin and lace dress and carries a white rose bouquet. Her head piece has white flowers and a tulle veil.

Small Stuff is an unusual 14″ girl doll with big pouty cheeks, a tiny red mouth, and blonde or brunette hair rooted on the top of her head only. The rest of her “hair” is just painted on. She wears a red and white print dress with a white bib, trimmed with white lace and black rickrack. She wears black stockings and shoes and has a straw hat with red ribbon. She probably came in other outfits as well. Both black and white versions of Small Stuff were made. Marked 1960.

Ricki has wild orange hair in two braids, a big goofy smile and freckles. I suspect she is meant to resemble Pippi Longstocking. She wears a strange outfit that is half plain white fabric, and half red-and-white check (stitched together down the middle).

Miss Renee is a 19″ glamour doll marked 14R, similar to Ideal’s Revlon Doll. A 10.5″ version was also sold to compete with Little Miss Revlon.

Raggedy Ann ventriloquist dummy by Jolly Toys Raggedy Ann ventriloquist dummy by Jolly Toys Raggedy Ann and Andy Ventriloquist dummies were made in 1973. They are 29″ tall and have plastic shoulder heads and hands with foam rubber bodies. There is a pull string at the back of the neck to make the movable jaw open and close.
Photos courtesy of Paul Muhlbach. Check out his eBay listings.

Wonder Skin Baby Doll was advertised in 1947.

The company also made a 24″ black girl doll with frosted hair; an “Eskimo” doll dressed in fur; a 24″ glamour doll with blue hair; 30″ and larger companion dolls; and an infant knockoff of American Character’s Baby Dear.



Copyright 1997-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Oct 272012
 
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Hasbro was started in Rhode Island in the 1920s by two brothers, Henry and Helal Hassenfeld, under the name Hassenfeld Brothers. They began making toys in the 1940s, and had their first big hit in 1952 with Mr. Potato Head. They branched out into dolls beginning in 1964 with G.I. Joe, although he was always called an “action figure” since the company figured boys wouldn’t play with a “doll.” The company officially changed its name to Hasbro in 1968.

Click on a photo to see a larger version.

Cutie Clothes by Hasbro As early as 1958, Hasbro stuck its toe into the doll market waters with Cutie Clothes, a series of clothing kits to dress 8″ to 10.5″ glamour dolls. Go to the Cutie Clothes page for more information.

GI Joe Adventure Team figure by Hasbro The G.I. Joe series of action figures has been continuously produced in one form or another since 1964. Originally representing fighting men of the various branches of the U.S. Armed Services, it has been expanded over the years to included some celebrities and fantasy figures. Pictured at left is a 12″ figure from the 1970’s Adventure Team series. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Little Miss No Name from 1965 is a 15″ pathetic girl doll dressed in rags, complete with plastic tear on her cheek. She was part of the mid-sixties fad for big-eyed waifs.

Peteena Poodle doll by Hasbro Peteena is an 11″ poodle fashion doll with additional outfits. Visit the Peteena page for all the details.

Dolly Darlings by Hasbro Dolly Darlings made from 1965-67 are 4″ dolls with molded hair. They came packaged in round plastic hatbox-type cases with accessories. A couple of years later, Dolly Darlings had rooted hair and were packaged in cardboard boxes with cello fronts or on bubble cards. Many different dolls were issued. Four different play rooms were also sold. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

The Flying Nun is a Dolly Darling dressed to represent Sally Field’s character Sister Bertrille from the popular 1960’s TV show.

That Kid! from 1967 is an unusual 21.5″ mechanical boy doll with a slingshot.

Flower Darlings (1968) are 3.5″ tall, came inside plastic flower pins. These dolls have the same head molds as Dolly Darlings but with smaller bodies.

Storykins (1969). These dolls were knockoffs of Mattel’s Liddle Kiddles, and represented characters from fairy tales including Snow white, Rumplestilskin and Cinderella. They came packaged with furniture and accessories. 2″ to 3.5″ tall.

World of Love dolls by Hasbro World of Love dolls by Hasbro World of Love dolls were made in 1971-72. With names like Love, Flower and Peace, these dolls embodied the best qualities of the youth culture of the late sixties and early seventies. They are 9″ tall and had many extra outfits, a carrying case and a few playsets. There are five girl dolls plus Adam, a boy with molded hair.

Miss Breck is an advertising doll for Breck Shampoo made from the same mold as World of Love.

Candy Babies dolls by Hasbro Candy Babies have vinyl heads and hands, and cloth bodies filled with foam and plastic pellets. They were advertising tie-ins to popular candies including Good ‘n Plenty and Baby Ruth.

Leggy Kate doll by Hasbro Leggy doll outfit by Hasbro Leggy (1973) These 10″ dolls are easy to identify. Most of their length is legs! Four different dolls were made. Photos courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.
Aimee doll by Hasbro Aimée is an 18″ doll with extra available hairpieces and fashions. Visit the Aimée page to learn more.

Sweet Cookie doll by Hasbro Sweet Cookie doll by Hasbro Sweet Cookie (1972) is an 18″ girl doll. She came in black or white versions with cooking accessories.

Romper Room Softies – 10″ cloth dolls tied in with the children’s TV show.

Flutter-byes – 1973 – Tiny 1.5″ dolls with wild colored hair and wings. They look like little flying trolls.

Farrah Fawcett doll from the Charlie's Angels series by Hasbro Charlie's Angels doll clothing by Hasbro Charlie’s Angels first produced in 1977 are 8.5″ dolls representing the three main characters from the TV show. Extra fashions were sold. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Video doll from the Jem Series by Hasbro Rio doll from the Jem Series by Hasbro Hasbro’s Jem line of 12″ dolls, produced from 1985 to 1987, were created to tie in with an animated children’s television series. The show, which ran from ’85 to ’88, had an interesting rock and roll/science fiction storyline with many characters. Pictured at left are Video, a minor character in the series, and Rio, the boyfriend of main character Jerrica Benton and her rock star alter ego Jem. Video photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings. Rio photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

Maxie doll by Hasbro Maxie is a 11.5″ Barbie type fashion doll representing a high school girl with friends, a boyfriend and high school-themed playsets. She was sold from 1988 to 1990. Like Jem, Maxie was also made into a cartoon show, called “Maxie’s World.” Photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

C.O.P.S. 'n Crooks action figure by Hasbro C.O.P.S. 'n Crooks action figure by Hasbro C.O.P.S. ‘n Crooks is a series of futuristic cops-and-robbers themed action figures. They were made in late ’80s, and, like Jem and Maxie, also tied in to a cartoon series. (Am I sensing a theme here?)

Hasbro has always focused more on their toys and games than their dolls (with the exception of G.I. Joe), and their acquisitions of Playskool, Parker Brothers, Milton Bradley, Kenner and Tonka in the 1980s and ’90s continued that trend. Today they are the largest toy company in the world. Hasbro is currently selling a new version of Kenner’s Blythe doll from the 1970s. Integrity Toys began making a new line of Jem dolls for adult collectors in 2012.

See also:


Copyright 2006-2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 192012
 
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Cosmopolitan is best known for their 8″ hard plastic Ginger doll, a competitor of Vogue’s Ginny. She was introduced in 1954. The hard plastic Gingers underwent several changes during the course of production, which makes identification a little tricky.

Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Hard plastic Ginger wears outfit #883 from the 1955 North and South series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

Collectors should also be aware that Cosmopolitan sold Ginger bodies to other companies. The book “Small Dolls of the ’40s and ’50s” by Carol J. Stover gives detailed information on the Ginger variations.


Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Vinyl head Ginger wears outfit #444 from the 1955 Holiday Series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

In 1957, they started making Ginger with a vinyl head. She also “grew up” with her new medium “cha cha” heels.


Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

That same year they entered the glamour doll market with 10.5″ Miss Ginger. Like Ginger, she had many extra outfits available. All-vinyl Miss Ginger is very similar to Little Miss Revlon and Miss Nancy Ann.


Little Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Little Miss Ginger wears Special Bride outfit #71 from 1958. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Little Miss Ginger also has a grown-up figure and extra outfits. She is also all vinyl. She is very similar to Little Miss Nancy Ann. Learn more on the Little Miss Ginger page.


Baby Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Most Baby Ginger dolls have rooted hair. This is a rare molded hair version. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Baby Ginger is an all-vinyl drink and wet baby doll, similar to Vogue’s Ginnette. She, too, has an extensive wardrobe.

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard