Nov 052012
 
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Swingtime doll by Jolly Toys

Swingtime doll by Jolly Toys.

Photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

Little information is available on this company. They made a variety of vinyl dolls, including high-heeled glamour dolls, babies and toddlers, starting about 1960, and continuing into the ’70s. The company apparently had some business arrangement with Nasco as well as Jolly, as dolls marked “Kaysam” have been found in Jolly and Nasco boxes.

Click on a small photo to view a larger version.

Swingtime (pictured above) is a 16″ vinyl toddler with rooted brown hair wearing an eyelet dress. She comes packaged in a 26″ tall red and yellow plastic swing set.

Glamour doll by Kaysam Kaysam glamour dolls were made in 15″, 20″ and 24″ sizes. They have a unique face that is easily recognizable once you have seen a few of them, with a long neck. They have a slim body which is more like Mattel’s Barbie than like other glamour dolls their size. Learn more about the doll pictured at left here. Photo courtesy of Sheryl Schmidt.
Doll in blue taffeta dress by Jolly Toys The glamour dolls marketed under the Jolly Toys name look more like Ideal’s Revlon doll and other late fifties high heeled dolls. Learn more about this doll here.

Hello Dolly (1964) is a 21″ high-heeled adult figured glamour doll. She wears a long slim red gown with an embroidered-looking front panel, as Carol Channing did in the Broadway show; but it is not a portrait of the star. A regular doll from the line was used (like the one above) marked 1961.

Vintage Judy baby doll by Kaysam Judy is an 11″ all vinyl bent leg baby doll. 1963.

Vintage Jean doll by Kaysam Jean is an 11.5″ toddler, who appears to have been made with the same head as Judy. 1963.

Robin is a toddler doll with straight platinum blonde hair with bangs. She wears a white jumper with red, white and blue striped blouse, white socks and red shoes. Her box is red, white and blue striped to match.

Vintage Kaysam 16 inch Nurse doll Vintage Kaysam 16 Vintage Kaysam 16 This 16″ Nurse came packaged in a gift set with a nurse’s bag, hypodermic needle (way out of scale) and bandaids, plus a cocktail dress and stole with corsage. The same doll was also sold in a different gift set wearing a pants outfit. 1963.

Cutie-Pie is another platinum blonde toddler.

Jinx is a knockoff of Vogue’s Brikette doll. She is 21″ tall with carrot red or black hair and a watermelon smile.

Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad dolls by Jolly Toys Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad dolls hang tag by Jolly Toys Swiss Miss and Swiss Lad were made as advertising tie-ins to Swiss Miss Cocoa. They are each 14″ tall. Swiss Miss is marked “Jolly Toys Inc. 1962″. A cloth Swiss Miss doll was produced in 1978, but probably by a different company. Photos courtesy of eBay seller myoldkentuckyhome.

Pride is a 6.5″ (Dawn-sized) fashion doll with long straight hair, who came packaged with an outfit. Packages containing two outfits (no doll) were also sold separately.

Grandma is 20″ tall, with a high-heeled glamour body, but an older lady’s face with gray hair. She has been found in Jolly marked boxes as well as Royal boxes, with the name Grannykins. These companies may have been related. A very rare Grandpa doll was made as well. For more info, go to the Grandma page.

Nikki is 12″ tall, platinum blonde and has an unusual expression with a puckered mouth. She looks like she is about to say something. She was sold in various outfits and hairstyles.

Golden Book Dolls is a series of dolls representing characters from Little Golden Books, each doll was packaged together with a book. Heidi is 14″ tall with blonde hair and a Swiss style outfit similar to that worn by Swiss Miss but with golden lacing on the front of the vest, and her blue skirt is a plain, not print fabric. Other dolls in the series were Hansel and Gretel (sold separately), Cinderella, Nurse Nancy, Little Red Riding Hood and My Dolly and Me.

12″ Bride doll has dark brunette hair and has painted side-glancing eyes. She somewhat resembles Horsman’s Mary Poppins doll. She wears a satin and lace dress and carries a white rose bouquet. Her head piece has white flowers and a tulle veil.

Small Stuff is an unusual 14″ girl doll with big pouty cheeks, a tiny red mouth, and blonde or brunette hair rooted on the top of her head only. The rest of her “hair” is just painted on. She wears a red and white print dress with a white bib, trimmed with white lace and black rickrack. She wears black stockings and shoes and has a straw hat with red ribbon. She probably came in other outfits as well. Both black and white versions of Small Stuff were made. Marked 1960.

Ricki has wild orange hair in two braids, a big goofy smile and freckles. I suspect she is meant to resemble Pippi Longstocking. She wears a strange outfit that is half plain white fabric, and half red-and-white check (stitched together down the middle).

Miss Renee is a 19″ glamour doll marked 14R, similar to Ideal’s Revlon Doll. A 10.5″ version was also sold to compete with Little Miss Revlon.

Raggedy Ann ventriloquist dummy by Jolly Toys Raggedy Ann ventriloquist dummy by Jolly Toys Raggedy Ann and Andy Ventriloquist dummies were made in 1973. They are 29″ tall and have plastic shoulder heads and hands with foam rubber bodies. There is a pull string at the back of the neck to make the movable jaw open and close.
Photos courtesy of Paul Muhlbach. Check out his eBay listings.

Wonder Skin Baby Doll was advertised in 1947.

The company also made a 24″ black girl doll with frosted hair; an “Eskimo” doll dressed in fur; a 24″ glamour doll with blue hair; 30″ and larger companion dolls; and an infant knockoff of American Character’s Baby Dear.



Copyright 1997-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Oct 292012
 
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Vintage composition Mary Hoyer doll

Composition Mary Hoyer doll in crocheted outfit.
Photo copyright Withington Auction, Inc.

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Mary's Dollies knit and crochet patterns for Mary Hoyer dolls Before she started in the doll business, Mary Hoyer was a designer of knit and crochet patterns for children’s clothing. In the 1930′s, she opened her own yarn and craft shop in Reading, PA. Soon she added doll clothing and patterns to her inventory. To create a market for her doll designs, she purchased composition dolls from Ideal to sell along with the patterns. These dolls were 13″ tall with a double jointed torso known as a “body twist.” These early painted-eye dolls have Ideal markings. Photo courtesy of Nancy McKee.

Composition Mary Hoyer doll Composition Mary Hoyer doll When Ideal discontinued the style of doll she had been using, Mrs. Hoyer hired renowned doll designer Bernard Lipfert to sculpt a doll for her. Lipfert’s design, manufactured by the Fiberoid Doll Co., was slightly bigger at 14″ tall and also had painted eyes, but did not have the jointed torso. The earliest dolls are unmarked, but soon the Mary Hoyer logo in a circle was added to the back of the doll. Dolls with sleep eyes were also added to the lineup. The same model was used for both girl and boy dolls. Photos copyright Withington Auction, Inc.

Hard plastic Mary Hoyer doll Hard plastic Mary Hoyer doll In 1946 Mary Hoyer switched from composition to hard plastic dolls, using the same design. She continued to market her knit and crochet patterns, and sold finished outfits and sewing kits in her shop as well as by mail order. Photos courtesy of Nancy McKee.

Gigi by Mary Hoyer Doll Co. In the mid-fifties, Mary Hoyer decided to branch out by adding other dolls to her line. The first was Gigi, an 18″ hard plastic girl. She has the same markings as the 14″ doll, and several outfits available for her. Photo courtesy of Nancy McKee.

Vicky and Margie dolls by Mary Hoyer The company then decided to try vinyl dolls; they marketed high-heeled glamour dolls that were reportedly made for them by Ideal. The larger sizes were quickly discontinued, but they sold 10.5″ Vicky (similar to Ideal’s Little Miss Revlon) for a couple of years. The glamour dolls are unmarked and very difficult to identify. Margie, a 10″ vinyl toddler, and babies Cathy (10″) and Jamie (8″) were also offered.

The company had continued to sell its 14″ hard plastic doll throughout the fifties, but in the early sixties, they switched to a new vinyl doll called Becky. Mary Hoyer retired in 1972, but her company was resurrected in 1990 by her granddaughter, Mary Lynne Saunders. They continue today making high-quality play dolls for children and collectors. Mrs. Hoyer passed away in 2003 at the age of 101.

Copyright 2006-2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 272012
 
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Hasbro was started in Rhode Island in the 1920s by two brothers, Henry and Helal Hassenfeld, under the name Hassenfeld Brothers. They began making toys in the 1940s, and had their first big hit in 1952 with Mr. Potato Head. They branched out into dolls beginning in 1964 with G.I. Joe, although he was always called an “action figure” since the company figured boys wouldn’t play with a “doll.” The company officially changed its name to Hasbro in 1968.

Click on a photo to see a larger version.

Cutie Clothes by Hasbro As early as 1958, Hasbro stuck its toe into the doll market waters with Cutie Clothes, a series of clothing kits to dress 8″ to 10.5″ glamour dolls. Go to the Cutie Clothes page for more information.

GI Joe Adventure Team figure by Hasbro The G.I. Joe series of action figures has been continuously produced in one form or another since 1964. Originally representing fighting men of the various branches of the U.S. Armed Services, it has been expanded over the years to included some celebrities and fantasy figures. Pictured at left is a 12″ figure from the 1970′s Adventure Team series. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Little Miss No Name from 1965 is a 15″ pathetic girl doll dressed in rags, complete with plastic tear on her cheek. She was part of the mid-sixties fad for big-eyed waifs.

Peteena Poodle doll by Hasbro Peteena is an 11″ poodle fashion doll with additional outfits. Visit the Peteena page for all the details.

Dolly Darlings by Hasbro Dolly Darlings made from 1965-67 are 4″ dolls with molded hair. They came packaged in round plastic hatbox-type cases with accessories. A couple of years later, Dolly Darlings had rooted hair and were packaged in cardboard boxes with cello fronts or on bubble cards. Many different dolls were issued. Four different play rooms were also sold. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

The Flying Nun is a Dolly Darling dressed to represent Sally Field’s character Sister Bertrille from the popular 1960′s TV show.

That Kid! from 1967 is an unusual 21.5″ mechanical boy doll with a slingshot.

Flower Darlings (1968) are 3.5″ tall, came inside plastic flower pins. These dolls have the same head molds as Dolly Darlings but with smaller bodies.

Storykins (1969). These dolls were knockoffs of Mattel’s Liddle Kiddles, and represented characters from fairy tales including Snow white, Rumplestilskin and Cinderella. They came packaged with furniture and accessories. 2″ to 3.5″ tall.

World of Love dolls by Hasbro World of Love dolls by Hasbro World of Love dolls were made in 1971-72. With names like Love, Flower and Peace, these dolls embodied the best qualities of the youth culture of the late sixties and early seventies. They are 9″ tall and had many extra outfits, a carrying case and a few playsets. There are five girl dolls plus Adam, a boy with molded hair.

Miss Breck is an advertising doll for Breck Shampoo made from the same mold as World of Love.

Candy Babies dolls by Hasbro Candy Babies have vinyl heads and hands, and cloth bodies filled with foam and plastic pellets. They were advertising tie-ins to popular candies including Good ‘n Plenty and Baby Ruth.

Leggy Kate doll by Hasbro Leggy doll outfit by Hasbro Leggy (1973) These 10″ dolls are easy to identify. Most of their length is legs! Four different dolls were made. Photos courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.
Aimee doll by Hasbro Aimée is an 18″ doll with extra available hairpieces and fashions. Visit the Aimée page to learn more.

Sweet Cookie doll by Hasbro Sweet Cookie doll by Hasbro Sweet Cookie (1972) is an 18″ girl doll. She came in black or white versions with cooking accessories.

Romper Room Softies – 10″ cloth dolls tied in with the children’s TV show.

Flutter-byes – 1973 – Tiny 1.5″ dolls with wild colored hair and wings. They look like little flying trolls.

Farrah Fawcett doll from the Charlie's Angels series by Hasbro Charlie's Angels doll clothing by Hasbro Charlie’s Angels first produced in 1977 are 8.5″ dolls representing the three main characters from the TV show. Extra fashions were sold. Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Video doll from the Jem Series by Hasbro Rio doll from the Jem Series by Hasbro Hasbro’s Jem line of 12″ dolls, produced from 1985 to 1987, were created to tie in with an animated children’s television series. The show, which ran from ’85 to ’88, had an interesting rock and roll/science fiction storyline with many characters. Pictured at left are Video, a minor character in the series, and Rio, the boyfriend of main character Jerrica Benton and her rock star alter ego Jem. Video photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings. Rio photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

Maxie doll by Hasbro Maxie is a 11.5″ Barbie type fashion doll representing a high school girl with friends, a boyfriend and high school-themed playsets. She was sold from 1988 to 1990. Like Jem, Maxie was also made into a cartoon show, called “Maxie’s World.” Photo courtesy of King Auctions. Check out their eBay listings.

C.O.P.S. 'n Crooks action figure by Hasbro C.O.P.S. 'n Crooks action figure by Hasbro C.O.P.S. ‘n Crooks is a series of futuristic cops-and-robbers themed action figures. They were made in late ’80s, and, like Jem and Maxie, also tied in to a cartoon series. (Am I sensing a theme here?)

Hasbro has always focused more on their toys and games than their dolls (with the exception of G.I. Joe), and their acquisitions of Playskool, Parker Brothers, Milton Bradley, Kenner and Tonka in the 1980s and ’90s continued that trend. Today they are the largest toy company in the world. Hasbro is currently selling a new version of Kenner’s Blythe doll from the 1970s. Integrity Toys began making a new line of Jem dolls for adult collectors in 2012.

See also:


Copyright 2006-2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 192012
 
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Cosmopolitan is best known for their 8″ hard plastic Ginger doll, a competitor of Vogue’s Ginny. She was introduced in 1954. The hard plastic Gingers underwent several changes during the course of production, which makes identification a little tricky.

Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Hard plastic Ginger wears outfit #883 from the 1955 North and South series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

Collectors should also be aware that Cosmopolitan sold Ginger bodies to other companies. The book “Small Dolls of the ’40s and ’50s” by Carol J. Stover gives detailed information on the Ginger variations.


Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Vinyl head Ginger wears outfit #444 from the 1955 Holiday Series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

In 1957, they started making Ginger with a vinyl head. She also “grew up” with her new medium “cha cha” heels.


Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

That same year they entered the glamour doll market with 10.5″ Miss Ginger. Like Ginger, she had many extra outfits available. All-vinyl Miss Ginger is very similar to Little Miss Revlon and Miss Nancy Ann.


Little Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Little Miss Ginger wears Special Bride outfit #71 from 1958. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Little Miss Ginger also has a grown-up figure and extra outfits. She is also all vinyl. She is very similar to Little Miss Nancy Ann. Learn more on the Little Miss Ginger page.


Baby Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Most Baby Ginger dolls have rooted hair. This is a rare molded hair version. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Baby Ginger is an all-vinyl drink and wet baby doll, similar to Vogue’s Ginnette. She, too, has an extensive wardrobe.

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 152012
 
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Cindy doll by Dee an Cee

Dee an Cee’s 17″ Cindy was sold in the late 1950s in a variety of outfits, including a bridal gown.

Dee an Cee was a Canadian doll manufacturer from 1938 to 1964. The name was derived from the first letters of the last names of the two founders, Max Diamond and Morris Cone. The company motto was “Quality above all”.

Through the 1940s, the company made composition dolls, mostly babies, including Snuggles, Sweetums and Little Darling. They briefly experimented with rubber dolls before switching over to vinyl beginning in 1949.

Many of the their products were licensed from U.S. companies and made from the original molds. They held the Canadian licenses to produce Mattel’s Chatty Cathy and Alexander’s Marybel. Sometimes the dolls names were changed; American Character’s Baby Dear was sold by Dee an Cee as Dream Baby, while Mattel’s Scooba-Doo became Kookie in Canada.
The company produced their own original dolls too. Mandy and Dusty, designed by Morris Cone, were black brother and sister dolls with realistic features and molded hair, first produced in 1956.

Dee an Cee was the first Canadian doll company to advertise on television. After the firm was sold to Mattel in 1962, manufacturing in Canada was gradually discontinued. The name was no longer used after 1964.

Dee an Cee dolls show a variety of markings, including D&C, Dee an Cee, Dee and Cee, and DEE & CEE.

More Dee an Cee dolls:

Copyright 2000-2012 by Zendelle Bouchard