May 202013
 
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Uneeda’s posable Dollikin is their most well-known glamour girl, but they used the same head mold to make other dolls without all the extra joints, including the ones pictured here and the Mother from the Wee Three set.

Glamour bride doll by Uneeda

Body Construction
These 19″ dolls have a rigid vinyl body with softer vinyl head. They are jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. Some, like the bride doll pictured above, are also jointed at the waist. They have sleep eyes with brush lashes, and painted lashes underneath each eye. They have unpainted nails. The glamour dolls came in a variety of haircolors, including carrot red, and in various styles, including the short bob shown on these dolls, and an updo with spit curl.

Markings
These dolls are marked “UNEEDA/2S” on the back of their heads below the hairline. This is the same marking as seen on the Dollikin heads.

Glamour doll by Uneeda

Clothing
These dolls came dressed in a variety of outfits. The bride doll is wearing an ivory satin wedding gown with unusual cowl neckline, trimmed with a ruffle of tulle. Two layers of tulle over the skirt give it volume. She wears satin full-length mitts and carries a small bouquet of simple white fabric flowers with satin streamers. Her veil is lace with a satin ribbon bow pinned to the back. She also wears drop pearl earrings, white nylon panties and white plastic heels.
The doll pictured above wears a lavender and white striped dress made of a silky taffeta, and she has a white satin ribbon bow at the neck. She also wears white nylon panties, pearl drop earrings and white plastic heels.

Packaging
The box the striped dress doll came in is pictured with her. The bottom is turquoise heavy corrugated cardboard. On one end is printed “Beauty Quality/A Uneeda Doll/Since 1917″ with space for the doll’s dress, eye, hair color and style number to be noted. “1202” is very lightly stamped as the style number. “COAP-122″ is written in pencil, but whether this is original is unknown.

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May 092013
 
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Photo courtesy of Laura Meisner.

Miss Twist is a variation of Uneeda’s Dollikin doll, marketed to capitalize on the “Twist” dance craze of the early 1960s.

Body Construction & Markings
For general information on body construction and markings, see the Dollikin page. Miss Twist was sold with a black curly bob hairdo and heavy black eye paint.

Clothing
She wears an ivory satin dress with layers of fringe on the skirt and around the neckline–sort of a flapper effect, with a matching headband and drop pearl earrings. She is pictured above with one of the regular line Dollikins.

Packaging
There is a photo of Miss Twist in her box on Valerie Myers’ website



Copyright 1997-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

May 062013
 
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In addition to being marketed as a fashion doll and as a ballerina, Uneeda’s Dollikin was also marketed as a Mommy, with an 8″ all-vinyl baby.

Mommy Dollikin & Her Lovable Baby by Uneeda

Body Construction & Markings
For general information on body construction and markings, see the Dollikin page. Mommy Dollikin had a short bob hairstyle.

Clothing
She was sold wearing one of two different outfits. The doll above wears a one-piece polished cotton jumpsuit with a red top, and multicolored floral print pants, collar and sleeves. Her shoes are red blue vinyl slip-ons. Baby wears a matching outfit of dress, panties and bonnet. This outfit was also available in a blue version, and possibly a green version. The other outfit Mommy Dollikin wears is a powder blue and white striped sweater, with corduroy slacks with braid trim up the outer seams. The slacks are most often yellow, but have also been found in a deep wine color. Her baby wears matching corduroy overalls.

Mommy Dollikin & Her Lovable Baby by Uneeda

Packaging
In addition to graphics extolling the virtues of posability, Mommy Dollikin’s packaging pictured a backdrop of idyllic suburban family life, with Dad at the barbecue and Rover ready to fetch the paper. The doll reclines on what is meant to represent a chaise longue.



Copyright 1997-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

Apr 242013
 
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Dollikin Ballerina doll by Uneeda

Body Construction
The Dollikin Ballerina is the same doll as the regular Dollikin, but she has a few specific traits. Her hair is usually black, and is styled into either a chignon with severe widow’s peak, or a short fluffy bubblecut. This doll did not generally have pierced ears. Her eye paint is exaggerated, with long black painted lashes at the outer corner of each eye, and black eyebrows. The less common blonde dolls have eyelashes and brows painted brown instead of black.

Markings
Markings are the same as Dollikin.

Clothing
The Dollikin Ballerina seems to have been available in a wide variety of costumes, generally in satin with lace or tulle. All came with cotton tights and soft vinyl slippers. The dressed doll pictured above wears a very stiff ivory-colored (may have been white at one time) costume with ivory, purple and green lace sleeves, with the same lace forming the skirt over a layer of tulle. Other costumes included a tutu edged with silver braid, with pink or lavender tulle skirt and sleeves covered with silver dots; and a red long sleeved dress which looks more like an ice skating or majorette outfit.

Packaging
The Ballerina doll was sold in different packaging from the regular Dollikin. The Ballerina’s box has her posed as if she is dancing, attached to a black and white backing card illustrated with her in various positions. The front of the box is curved and has a large plastic window to display her beautifully. You can see a photo of her on Valerie Myers’ website.





Copyright 1997-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Apr 132013
 
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Dollikin by Uneeda

Scan from 1958 Niresk Industries catalog.

Uneeda’s 19 inch Dollikin is perhaps the most fascinating of the glamour dolls. (The ad above must be including the height of her hair.) Her ultra-posable body, featuring no less than 16 separate joints, makes for a realism, both in play and display, that no other fashion doll of the late fifties can match. A rare 15″ Dollikin was also sold in 1958. The name was also used for a posable Barbie-sized doll in the late sixties, and a 6″ multi-jointed doll in the early ’70s.

The 19″ doll was also available as Dollikin Ballerina, Miss Twist (in fringed flapper dress), or in a set with a baby doll as Mommy Dollikin and Her Lovable Baby.

Body Construction
Dollikin has a hard plastic, strung body and soft vinyl head with sleep eyes in various colors with brush lashes. She is jointed at neck, waist, hips, shoulders, wrists, elbows, knees, ankles and upper arms. Click here for a photo of a nude Dollikin showing her multiple joints. There were some molding changes with the doll throughout her period of manufacture. The size of the head was decreased toward the end of production, and at some point her hands became smaller and more dainty, and her eyes were made larger.

Dollikin‘s rooted hair, available in various shades, originally came styled in either a short or long wavy or curly bob with bangs, ponytail with bangs, or chignon with widow’s peak or spit curl. The later issue dolls had short straight hair parted in the center. Her hair is not very high quality, so that it is difficult to restore a doll with played-with hair to original condition. Generally, dolls with the spit curl style had pierced ears and pearl drop earrings, while dolls with the other hair styles had unpierced ears.

The Dollikin Ballerina, and also Miss Twist, generally had black hair and black eyebrows, as well as black eyelashes painted on the outer corner of each eye.

Markings
She is marked “UNEEDA/2S” on the back of her neck. The Dollikin head with these same markings was also used for dolls with regular glamour bodies that didn’t have all the extra joints.

Clothing
Dollikin’s clothing is not tagged, but may be identified by the factory snaps with white “donut” outer half and the words “SK LIKITS RAU” inscribed on the inner silver half. While other manufacturers used these snaps as well, it is a fairly good bet that if your doll is wearing an outfit with these snaps, it is original.

Outfits the dolls were sold in include the following:

  • Black velvet pants, white long sleeved shirt with lace trim down front and on cuffs, red necktie, black elastic-strap sandals
  • Blue, green and white plaid pants, white blouse, red felt vest with lapels to match pants, black elastic-strap sandals. See photo here. This outfit was also available in a variation with a predominantly red plaid.
  • Red, blue and green plaid pants, white long-sleeved blouse with matching plaid placket and cuffs.

  • “Lotus Blossom” outfit of white blouse and pants, long vest with oriental fan print, white shoes. See photo above. This outfit was copied by Valentine for their Mannikin doll – see that page for keys to telling them apart.

Packaging
Dollikin’s original box had a gold lid, which when opened, showed her displayed in a seated position facing left, with graphics all around her highlighting her poseability and play value. She was available later on in a blue box with a cellophane window. The doll was seated in the same position as in the first issue box, with drawings of outdoor scenes decorating the interior.

To see more Dollikin photos, visit Michele Collishaw’s site.



Copyright 1997-2013 by Zendelle Bouchard.