Oct 032012
 
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Canadian doll maker Earle Pullan Co., Ltd. began operations in 1945 and was in business until 1967. They began by making plush animals and games, and in 1947 they began producing composition dolls. During the 1950s, they went on to make dolls from stuffed rubber, cloth and vinyl. They made very few hard plastic dolls. Some of their dolls were copies of popular American dolls. Pullan dolls are well made and attractive.

Little Mr. Bad Boy doll by Earle Pullan

30″ Little Mr. Bad Boy doll by Earle Pullan. Photo courtesy of eBay seller Connectibles.

Dolls they produced include:

Dinky Drinky (1948)
10″ all composition drink and wet baby, jointed at shoulders and hips. Painted black side glancing eyes, molded hair.

Baby Twinkle (1948)
Composition toddler girl with a knee-length wavy blonde mohair wig. She is similar in design to Ideal’s Sparkle Plenty, except that doll had a hard plastic head, latex rubber body and wool yarn hair.

Little Lulu (1949)
14″ all cloth comic character doll was identical to the one produced by Georgene Novelties in the United States. Pullan also made a composition version of Little Lulu in 1951 and a vinyl version in 1959.

Coronation Doll (1953)
Celebrating the coronation of Queen Elizabeth, this all composition girl doll has an open mouth with teeth, and sleep eyes. She wears a long gown and sash, and “ermine” trimmed cape with matching hat.

Candy (1956)
17″ toddler has a one piece vinyl body with a wire armature inside so she can be posed. Wears a striped footie pajama with matching nightcap.

Mindy (1957)
15″ black vinyl girl doll, wired for posability, molded hair in braids. She appears to be identical to Dee an Cee’s Mandy doll.

Baby Tears (1957)
Drink-wet-and-cry baby doll in 14″ and 16″ sizes. Came with a layette.

Ballerina (1957)
This 17″ doll had brunette in a chignon style and wired legs for posability. She is unmarked.

Bride (1958)
17″ tall, with jointed hips, shoulders and neck. She has rooted blonde hair, blue sleep eyes, earrings and a lace-trimmed gown. She is marked “PULLAN”.

Mother and Family (1958)
This family of four dolls is similar to Effanbee’s Most Happy Family. The boy and girl dolls resemble Effanbee’s Mickey and Fluffy which were used in that set. In the Pullan version, the glamourous 21″ mother and 12″ daughter wear matching solid-color coats with white collars. Mother also wears a hat, pearl drop earrings and black elastic-strap high heels. Her daughter’s outfit has a hood. The 10″ son wears a matching suit with short pants. The 8″ baby doll wears a light-colored bunting. They are all unmarked.

Rags to Riches Doll (1958)
21″ tall, jointed only at neck and shoulders. She has long rooted reddish-brown hair worn in a ponytail with bangs, and blue sleep eyes with lashes. The book photograph shows her in a long gown; she may also have come with a “Rags” dress like the Deluxe Reading doll of the same name. She is marked “PULLAN” on the back of her neck; “A” on her back; “16” on the sole of her left foot; and “VH3-21″ on the sole of her right foot.

Oriental Princess (1958)
This 20″ doll appears to have been made as a knockoff of Uneeda’s Dollikin. She is jointed at the neck, waist, hips, shoulders, knees and ankles. Her long black hair is worn up in a roll and she has blue sleep eyes with brush lashes and painted lower lashes. The most telling trait is her outfit, which is very similar to Dollikin’s “Lotus Blossom” ensemble, a white pantsuit with long fan-print vest. She can be identified by the “PULLAN” mark on her head.

Beatnik Doll (1960)
21″ girl doll with long straight hair and bangs. She appears to have been made from the same head mold as Vogue’s Brikette doll.

Wendy Ann (1960)
35″ companion doll similar to Ideal’s Patti Playpal.

Little Mister Bad Boy (1961)
See photo above. Advertising doll for the Bad Boy Furniture Company wears a striped prisoner’s uniform. He was made in 16″ and 30″ sizes. At least one other company produced these dolls as well.

Bobby (1960s)
A popular all vinyl boy doll with molded hair, sold in various outfits in various sizes.

Miss Marjie (1965)
Similar to Eegee’s Shelley doll, she looked like Ideal’s Tammy but had the growing hair feature of American Character’s Tressy.

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard