Aug 302012
 
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The photos below show three dolls by Ideal – left to right they are Glamour Misty, Pos’n Misty and the later version of Pos’n Tammy, called Grown Up Pos’n Tammy by collectors.

Vintage Misty and Tammy dolls by Ideal

L to R: Glamour Misty, Pos’n Misty, “Grown Up” Pos’n Tammy

Glamour Misty is a regular Misty doll with platinum blonde hair, who was sold in a set with special markers to color her hair. She has straight (non-bendable) legs.

Pos’n Misty has soft vinyl legs wired for posability. All versions of Misty have the same torso and wired, posable arms.

“Grown Up” Pos’n Tammy has the same arms, too, but a different torso than the Mistys, with a smaller bust. She has the same flexible, wired legs as the Pos’n Misty. Her head mold is different also.

Vintage Ideal Misty and Tammy dolls

Note Misty and “Grown Up” Tammy have different torsos.

There was also a “Grown Up” Tammy (not shown) who had straight legs like the regular Misty and Glamour Misty dolls. Because the “Grown Up” dolls are much slimmer than the earlier versions of Tammy, most Tammy fashions don’t fit them well.



Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Mar 112012
 
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At an auction today I picked up a boxlot which included several photos of Shirley Temple. Some of the photos are of her holding a doll, so I thought I would share them with you. This first photo shows her with one of the rare Shirley Temple Baby dolls issued in 1935. The Baby has a composition head and limbs and a cloth body.

In the second photo, Shirley and her doll are both wearing the polka dotted dress from the film “Stand Up and Cheer.” The dolls were sold in several different variations of this dress. The doll is made of composition with a mohair wig.
The pleated dress with glued-on daisies on the yoke was from the film “Curly Top.” There was also a version with smaller embroidered flowers.
This photo shows Shirley holding a cloth sailor doll. Shirley amassed a huge collection of dolls, many of which were gifts from friends, admirers and film industry people. At one time her collection was displayed at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago. It’s always fun to see what dolls you can spot in her movies.
The striped cotton dress is also from “Curly Top.” As with the other outfits Ideal made for the Shirley dolls, there were color variations. All of the Ideal Shirley Temple dolls were sold wearing a pin featuring a photo of Shirley.
The Ideal composition Shirley Temple dolls were the biggest selling dolls of the 1930s. The dolls were available in nine different sizes and sold in the millions. They remain very popular with collectors and command high prices if in excellent condition, or if wearing a rare outfit. Do you have a Shirley Temple doll in your collection?
Sep 122011
 
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This is Jackie by Ideal. She is 15″ tall, all vinyl, and is quite rare. She was made in 1961, and according to Judith Izen’s book “Collector’s Guide to Ideal Dolls,” she was taken off the market after First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy objected to her name being used for the doll, although the doll looks nothing like her. The Jackie doll is very similar to Ideal’s Liz doll, who was also sold under the name Carol Brent in the Montgomery Ward catalog. The major difference is that Jackie has sleep eyes, while Liz/Carol’s eyes were painted.
Jackie is very high quality and is the epitome of a sophisticated fashion doll.

Mar 192011
 
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At the San-D-over Doll Club meeting today, we had a program on Toni dolls. We watched the DVD “Which Doll is the Toni?” from UFDC and members brought in a variety of Tonis to share, including the original Ideal hard plastic dolls, the 10″ vinyl version from American Character and her larger sisters, and newer reproductions. I normally don’t care much for newer dolls, but was very impressed with the repros of the Ideal Toni by Tonner/Effanbee. They look just like the vintage dolls, with beautiful hair and lovely dresses. I wasn’t too taken by their repros of the American Character 13″ Toni though – she doesn’t have the charm of the original, in my opinion.

This type of program, with a DVD and show-and-tell, works well for a small doll club. What has your club been doing lately?

Apr 012010
 
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Today I was scanning the doll pages from the 1963 Sears Toy Book so I can list it on ebay. What a great year for dolls that was! Barbie, Tammy, Chatty Cathy, Tiny Tears, Raggedy Ann and Andy, Tressy, and on and on. Here’s a little bit of the magic: