Half Pint doll by Effanbee 1966-1980s

 Effanbee, Vinyl  Comments Off on Half Pint doll by Effanbee 1966-1980s
Sep 222012
 
Share

Half Pint is a sweet vinyl toddler doll who was a mainstay of Effanbee’s line for many years.

Half Pint doll by Effanbee

Half Pint #6228, circa 1970. Notice the spelling of her name on the tag.

Body Construction
Half Pint is an all-vinyl doll jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. She has rooted hair in various shades and an adorable closed mouth smile. Her most notable feature is her black pupilless side-glancing sleep eyes. The first year only white girl dolls were offered. Beginning in 1967, both boys and girls were sold in white and black versions, all made from the same head mold. Half Pint is usually seen as a girl doll.

Half Pint doll by Effanbee

Half Pint #6252 ballerina from 1975.

Markings
Half Pint is marked “EFFANBEE // 19©66”.

Clothing
Half Pint was sold in a few different outfits each year, mostly simple play clothes, party dresses and sleepwear. In 1970 she was offered in a gift set with extra clothes and accessories. Beginning in 1971, she was often part of Effanbee’s theme groupings, which featured several different dolls in their line wearing matching outfits.

Effanbee Half Pint doll

Packaging
For the first few years, Half Pint’s wrist tag spelled her name “Baby 1/2 Pint,” although the catalog always listed her as “Half Pint.” Her window box has changed over the years with the rest of Effanbee’s line. Initially she was sold in a pink box. For much of the ’70s, she had a box with a blue lid with pink and blue on the bottom. Later she was sold in a white box with a mustard-colored lid.

See also:

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Sep 172012
 
Share
Composition and cloth mama doll by Eegee

This mama doll by Eegee has a composition head and limbs with a cloth body. She has a human hair wig and likely dates from the 1920s.

This company, founded in 1917 by E. G. Goldberger, made a wide variety of dolls, including composition, hard plastic and vinyl. They used the trademark “EEGEE” early on. Their dolls were often knockoffs of the popular dolls of the day. In the 1930’s, they made the Shirley Temple-types Little Miss Movie and Miss Charming. In the ’50s, Susan Stroller was an alternative to Ideal’s Saucy Walker, while Eegee’s beautiful line of Little Debutante dolls competed with Ideal’s Revlon and Little Miss Revlon. The 28″ version was also sold as a Bride.

In the ’60s, Mattel’s Barbie, Skipper and Ken were the inspiration for Eegee’s Annette, Little Sister and Andy. Miss Babette was another Barbie clone. Tandy Talks was a cuter version of Mattel’s Chatty Cathy, complete with freckles. Shelley managed to copy two different dolls at the same time – she looked like Ideal’s Tammy, but had the “growing hair” feature of American Character’s Tressy.

Gemmette was a 15″ lady doll from 1963. She came in various hair colors and outfits, but always a long fancy gown. Eegee made Dolly Parton in doll form, in both 12″ and 17″ sizes. A number of ventriloquist dolls were produced over the years, including Lester, W. C. Fields, Groucho Marx, Bozo the Clown and Charlie McCarthy.

17.5″ Miss Sunbeam was an advertising doll for Sunbeam bread sold in 1959. She is all vinyl with blonde hair and blue eyes. Another product tie-in the company produced was the Kool-Aid Kid in 1989, a little girl wearing a red sweatshirt with her name on the front. She came in various hair colors, including a bright red.

The company also produced some very original dolls. Puppetrina, introduced in 1963, was a 22″ vinyl doll whose arms and legs could be manipulated like a puppet. There was a Baby Puppetrina as well. Honey Munch from the ’70s was an unusual ventriloquist baby doll. Maskerade Magic dolls came with five different masks for the dolls to wear.

Eegee is still in business under the name of The Goldberger Company, making dolls and toys for very young children with a lifetime guarantee.

See also:


Copyright 2006-2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Sep 162012
 
Share

Deluxe Reading, based in Elizabeth, NJ, was a major doll manufacturer active from the late fifties into the mid-seventies. The company was variously known as Deluxe, Deluxe Reading, Deluxe Toy Creations, Deluxe Premium Corp., Deluxe Topper, Topper Toys and Topper Corp. Many of their dolls were sold through grocery stores in boxes with colorful graphics. Some dolls that were marketed by Deluxe Reading were identical to dolls sold by other companies, including Arrow and Allied.

Baby Brite doll by Deluxe Reading

Baby Brite by Deluxe Reading

Baby Dolls

Suzy Cute is a 7″ baby with extra outfits and accessories, including a crib and playpen. 13″ Baby Brite (pictured above) will raise her arms to be picked up when you press the button in her tummy. Baby Magic nurses, cries and pouts. Tickles is a battery operated 20″ baby who laughs and cries. Baby Boo is another of Deluxe’s battery powered crying babies. 19″ Baby Catch-a-Ball wears metal bracelets that attract her magnetic ball. She has an unusual expression with tongue sticking out. Little Miss Fussyis a drink and wet doll that will whine until her diaper is changed. Several other mechanical babies were made in the late sixties.

 

Smarty Pants doll by Deluxe Reading

Smarty Pants is a battery powered talker.

Girl dolls

Little Miss Fashion Doll, despite her name, is a little girl doll sold with four complete outfits, including a snow suit, pajama set, cowgirl costume and party dress. Suzy Smart is 24″ tall and is a battery operated talking doll with jointed knees. She came in a set with school desk and blackboard. Deluxe Beauty Parlor Doll is the same doll, without the talking mechanism.


8″ Penny Brite was one of Deluxe’s biggest sellers. She came in a plastic case and had numerous extra outfits, as well as play sets and a car. She is shown with the desk and blackboard from her School Room set.


Suzy Homemaker is 22″ tall and had accessories including an ironing board and iron, and refrigerator. Some items were child size rather than doll size.


Candy Fashion doll by Deluxe Reading

Candy Fashion

Fashion & Glamour dolls

Deluxe’s 30″ high heeled glamour dolls include Darling Debbie, Sweet Rosemary, Sweet Ann and Betty the Beautiful Bride. These dolls have stuffed vinyl bodies and wear long fancy gowns. Bonnie Bride is an unusual doll who can “walk” down the aisle (on her rolling stand) and even throw the bouquet. 21″ Candy Fashion (pictured above) is one of Deluxe’s most beloved dolls. She was sold in a set with three dress forms and extra outfits. Candy has been reproduced by Charisma, but the new version is only 18″ tall. Deluxe Fashion Parade is another doll with extra outfits. She was available in 19″ and 25″ sizes. Gail of the West is a cowgirl doll. The Rags to Riches doll comes with both a “rich girl” and “poor girl” outfit. Pam and an unnamed Ballerina / Skater are two more of their high heeled glamour dolls.


Dawn doll by Topper Toys

Dawn in her first issue box. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

Dawn

6.5″ Dawn was a big success in the early seventies, and was widely imitated. Her most common friends are Glori, Angie, Dale, Jessica and Longlocks. Dawn’s male friends include Gary, Van and Ron. They were sold in regular and dancing versions. There was a series of Model Agency friends and another series of Majorette friends. Dawn has many extra outfits and playsets, even a car. One problem for collectors is the “blue knees” these dolls get due to a chemical reaction between the vinyl of their legs and the metal joint inside. Dawn and some of her friends were reissued by Checkerboard Toys for a few years beginning in the late 1990s.

Novelty dolls

The Go-Gos are 6.5″ character dolls with vinyl limbs wired for posability. The include Private Ida (a detective), Brenda Brush (an artist) and Cool Cat (a folk singer with guitar). Eight different dolls were made.

Copyright Zendelle Bouchard 1997-2016

Godey’s Little Lady Dolls

 Bisque & China, Ruth Gibbs  Comments Off on Godey’s Little Lady Dolls
Sep 262011
 
Share

Here’s something a little different for you mint in box fans. A lot of vintage doll collectors who are familiar with vinyl and hard plastic dolls think these Ruth Gibbs dolls are antiques. Actually they were made in the 1940s in Flemington, New Jersey. They have china (glazed bisque) heads and limbs with a cloth body. They are commonly found in this 7″ size, but 10″ and 12″ dolls were made as well. Sets like Little Women and these Flower Girls can sometimes be found.

Apr 252011
 
Share

Effanbee’s composition Patsy was a real trendsetter. Debuting in the 1920’s, she was one of the first American made dolls who was truly modern. She reflected the big changes that were occurring in fashion and society – flappers, bobbed hair, short skirts for little girls. Patsy was a smash hit and Effanbee took the opportunity to put out a whole series of similar dolls in different sizes. Among them were Patsy Ann, Patsy Lou, Patsy Mae, Patsy Baby, and this little sweetheart, Patsyette. At 9″ tall, Patsyette was the perfect size for a little girl to take everywhere. This darling set in the original cardboard case holds a dressed doll and three extra outfits. Photo courtesy of Debbie’s Dolls.