Oct 012013
 
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Maskerade Magic doll by Eegee, 1976

Eegee’s Maskerade Magic is a fun set that includes a 14″ boy or girl doll with five different masks for the doll to wear. Four different sets were pictured in the catalog, but the sets with the boy dolls seem to be rare or nonexistent. It is possible they were not produced beyond the prototype stage.

Maskerade Magic doll by Eegee, 1976

Body Construction
The doll has a vinyl head and heads with a soft stuffed cloth body. He or she has painted eyes and rooted hair. The clothing is part of the body.

Markings
The doll is marked “EEGEE Co. // 12D // Made in Hong Kong” on the back of her head.

Clothing
The girl doll wears a blue skirt over her purple, blue and green cloth body. The boy doll’s body is made to look like a striped shirt and rust colored pants. His feet are black.

Maskerade Magic doll by Eegee, 1976

Masks
The girl doll is most often found with the set that includes a nurse, red haired and black haired princesses, majorette and blonde bride masks. She was also packaged in an alternate set that included the majorette and one of the princesses, plus clown, bear and bunny masks. The boy may be packaged with firefighter, doctor, pirate, football player and cowboy masks; or with the clown, bear, pirate, a Frankenstein and a character with blue skin and a gold (?) helmet. I don’t recognize that last one but he may be a comic character.

Maskerade Magic doll by Eegee, 1976

Packaging
Although the catalog illustrations shown picture the doll packaged on the left side of the box, with the masks on the right, all the actual sets I have seen have the doll in the middle with the masks on either side.



Copyright 2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

Aug 192013
 
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Little Miss Fussy doll by Topper Toys.

Notice the long nipple on Little Miss Fussy’s bottle.

Li’l Miss Fussy is a battery-operated baby doll who kicks and cries (more of squeak, actually) when she needs to be changed. The secret is in the long nipple of her special bottle, and the metal tabs on her diapers which insert into slots in her right side. She comes with two diapers – one has a triangular metal tab, and the other a rectangular tab. After her bottle is inserted and removed, she will kick her legs and make noise until the diaper is removed. You can then dress her in the other diaper and do it over again.

Little Miss Fussy doll by Topper Toys

Little Miss Fussy has slots in her right side where the tabs on her diapers fit.

Body Construction
Li’l Miss Fussy is 18″ long, with a rigid vinyl head and arms, blow molded vinyl bent legs, and hard plastic torso. She has blonde hair styled with curls on top, and blue eyes with brush lashes that do not close. She has an adorable face. She needs 2 “D” cell batteries to operate.

Her diapers close with snaps on the side. Next to the snap on the right side, is the special metal tab that fits into the doll’s body.

Clothing
Li’l Miss Fussy wears a pink cotton dress trimmed with synthetic lace and pink satin bow, her diaper of woven fabric, and terry cloth booties.

Markings
She is marked “K 29 // DELUXE TOPPER // 19(copyright symbol)67” on the back of her head.

Little Miss Fussy doll by Topper Toys

Packaging
Li’l Miss Fussy’s box has a clear color photo of her on the front. It states “As Seen on TV” so a commercial must have been made.



Copyright 2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

Jan 212013
 
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Vintage Honey doll by Effanbee

Effanbee’s hard plastic Honey doll in one of her many day dresses.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls

Honey was Effanbee’s flagship doll during the brief hard plastic era. She was sold in many variations, under a few different names and in numerous outfits. Honey is one of the classic dolls of the 1950s.

Beginning in 1949, Honey was offered in 13.5,” 16″ and 18″ sizes. She was sometimes called Honey Girl during this early period. These dolls are all hard plastic, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. They have sleep eyes with brush lashes, and mohair wigs.

1950 Effanbee Honey Majorette doll

Effanbee’s Honey as a Majorette.
Scan from the 1950 Montgomery Ward Christmas catalog.

In 1950, a 21″ size composition (not hard plastic) Honey was sold with flirty eyes and a human hair wig.

1950 composition Honey doll by Effanbee

This is the 21″ all composition version of Honey. She has flirty eyes and a human hair wig.
Scan from the 1950 Montgomery Ward Christmas catalog.

In 1951, the Tintair Doll was introduced. This is Honey with platinum blonde Dynel hair meant to be “tinted” with special redhead and brunette hair coloring. The smallest size doll was now 14″ tall. All Honey dolls had synthetic hair after this point. The Saran Yarns Company used Honey in their ads promoting the many uses of their Saran fiber.

There was also a special series of 18″ Honey dolls in 1951 with couture outfits by the famous Italian designer Elsa Schiaparelli.

In 1952, the Honey Walker doll was introduced. She has a walking mechanism which also turns her head, but is otherwise identical to the regular Honey. Both versions were produced through 1957.

In 1952, Honey portrayed both Cinderella and Prince Charming. He is the only male doll made using the Honey mold.

14

14″ Honey as Prince Charming, the companion to Cinderella.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls

In 1954, 15″ Honey was offered in a carrying case or steamer trunk with extra outfits.

Honey got jointed knees and ankles in 1956. This doll is 20″ tall. The harder to find 15″ doll has jointed ankles, but not knees. She could wear high heels or ballerina shoes in addition to her regular flat Mary Janes and majorette boots. Honey sold in high heels was called Junior Miss, a Doll with Glamour.

In the last year of Honey’s production, 1957, she was offered as Honey Ballerina. She has vinyl arms which may or may not be jointed at the elbows.

Hard plastic Honey doll by Effanbee

Effanbee’s hard plastic Honey doll was sold in a variety of long gowns. Her hat may not be original.

See also:





Copyright 2013 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 252012
 
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Ralph Freundlich started in the doll business in New York City during the 1920’s and in 1934 relocated his manufacturing operations to Clinton, MA. The company made composition dolls including mama dolls, celebrity dolls, storybook characters and military dolls. Their products were mostly cheaper quality but have personality. Most of their dolls are unmarked. After a fire destroyed the factory, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1945 and their assets were sold.

“Doll Collectors Manual 1967” published by the Doll Collectors of America, Inc., has a wonderful collection of photos of manufacturing operations taken by Richard Merrill at the Clinton plant in 1938. Anyone interested in how composition dolls were made would appreciate seeing them. This book out of print but often available from online sources.

Note: these dolls are all unmarked, with the exception of Baby Sandy. Click on a small photo to see a larger version.

Baby Dolls
Several different models made, with painted hair and eyes, including 12″ Baby Bunting in oval box, 8″ or 12″ Nursing Doll in trunk, 9.5″ baby with basket, bedding and scale.

14" Little Orphan Annie doll by Freundlich Little Orphan Annie was made in at least three different sizes by Freundlich. The 14″ version pictured at left looks a bit different than the smaller dolls. Go to the Little Orphan Annie page to learn more. Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Feather Weight Doll
28″ tall, composition head, forearms and lower legs, stuffed cloth body, sold in assorted dresses with matching bonnets and panties.

Baby Sandy doll by Freundlich Baby Sandy doll by Freundlich Baby Sandy
This doll is the easiest Freundlich doll to identify, marked “BABY SANDY” on the back of the head. Made in 8″, 12″ and 16″ sizes, it is an all-composition portrait doll of the ’30s child star Sandra Henville. Made with either sleep eyes or painted eyes, molded hair. Baby Sandy is usually a toddler doll, but there was also a bent-leg baby version. Right photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Goldy-Locks
Composition head with big blue side-glancing eyes, blonde mohair wig in ringlet curls, pink plush body.

Trixbe
11″ Patsy type girl doll, all composition, has bent right arm and straight left arm, third and fourth fingers molded together, molded short bob hairstyle, unmarked. Both white and black versions were sold.

General Douglas MacArthur doll by Freundlich General Douglas MacArthur doll by Freundlich General Douglas MacArthur
18″ portrait doll of the World War II hero has a molded hat, military uniform, right arm bent to salute. Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Military dolls
15″ All composition dolls with molded hair and hats, dressed as Soldier, Sailor, WAAC and WAVE. All came with shield-shaped paper tags pinned to the clothing.

Animal dolls
These include a rabbit, cat (dressed as Puss In Boots), monkey and pig, with a Patsyette type human body (e.g. hands instead of paws). The rabbit is 12″ tall because of the ears, others are 9″ to 9.5″.

Pinocchio
16″ doll with compo head and body, wooden limbs, brightly painted with red hair, blue eyes, pointy nose. Wears orange pants, green jacket with orange collar and cuffs.

Red Riding Hood set of dolls by Freundlich Red Riding Hood set
Each 9.5″ tall, simple cotton clothing, no shoes, sold in a lithographed schoolhouse box.

Three Little Pigs set
10″ pigs (each identical except for the colors of their plaid dresses), 9.5″ wolf has a different head mold than the Riding Hood wolf, with shorter snout. Sold in a boxed set.

Goo-Goo Eye Dolls are 14″, 19″ and 27″ dolls with composition heads and stuffed cloth bodies. Flat celluloid eyes with moving pupils. Hair ribbon or hat stapled to head, printed fabric, plush or terry cloth body. Available in white and black versions.
15″ Topsy and Eva Goo-Goo dolls were more elaborate with flesh-colored bodies, separate outfits and wigs.

Ventriloquist dolls and marionettes
A variety of ventriloquist dolls were made, including 14″ Dummy Clown and 20″ Dummy Dan, with composition heads and arms, cloth body and legs, large painted side-glancing eyes, moving jaws. 12″ Charlie McCarthy-type is all compo, jointed only at the jaw. 17″ Marionettes have compo head, hands and feet, wooden dowels for legs and moving jaws.

Dummy Don
All composition, 10″ tall, similar to Dummy Dan but without the jointed jaw.



Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
American Composition Dolls
1900-1950
by Ursula R. Mertz
Find it on eBay.
cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
American Composition Dolls
1900-1950, Volume II
by Ursula R. Mertz
Find it on eBay.
cover
Compo Dolls 1928-55
by Polly and Pam Judd
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2005-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Oct 052012
 
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In the early to mid-twentieth century, Effanbee made some of the world’s best and most popular composition dolls, including Grumpy, Bubbles, the Patsy family and Little Lady.

The company was started in 1910 by two businessmen who operated neighboring shops on Atlantic City’s boardwalk. Bernard Fleischaker and Hugo Baum began by selling toys and dolls; within a couple of years they were having doll heads made especially for them, and by the 1920s were making their own composition parts. Although the company was officially called Fleischaker and Baum, they began using the trademark EFFanBee (from the first letters of their last names) by 1915, and eventually that became the name of the company.

Read about rubber, hard plastic, and vinyl dolls by Effanbee here.

Click on a photo to view a larger version.

Effanbee Baby Grumpy Jr. doll Effanbee Baby Grumpy Jr. doll In the teens and early twenties, many Effanbee dolls were composition copies of popular German bisque head dolls, like Grumpy, who was produced in several sizes and variations. The doll at left is Baby Grumpy.

Coquette doll by Effanbee Coquette doll by Effanbee Coquette is another copy of a German bisque doll. The same doll was also sold as Naughty Marietta.

Effanbee Kid Body Composition doll Effanbee Kid Body Composition doll The kid bodied doll has a composition shoulder head, arms and lower legs. She dates from 1920. This is the type of doll that had been imported from Germany, and became unavailable during World War I.

Bubbles doll by Effanbee Bubbles doll by Effanbee Bubbles was a huge success for Effanbee beginning in 1926. Bubbles has an interesting composition shoulder plate that extends down under her arms. She was sold as a bent leg baby as well as a straight leg toddler. As with many early Effanbee dolls, a lot of variations exist. Bubbles was sculpted by Bernard Lipfert, who also designed Shirley Temple for Ideal, the Dionne Quintuplets for Madame Alexander, and Effanbee’s Patsy.

Patsy Ann doll by Effanbee Patsy Lou doll by Effanbee In 1928, Effanbee came out with a doll that was so original she would vault them to the forefront of the business. The doll was 14″ Patsy, and she was a sensation. Patsy was so popular that Effanbee introduced several other “family members” – similar dolls in different sizes, including 19″ Patsy Ann, pictured far left, and 22″ Patsy Lou, pictured near left. Patsy was extensively copied by other manufacturers. She also has a place in history as the first modern fashion doll, for whom extra outfits were sold.Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Skippy doll by Effanbee Skippy, a comic strip character created by Percy L. Crosby, was advertised as Patsy’s boy friend. At first he was made using Patsy’s body, but later versions have a cloth torso. Skippy was often sold in uniform, including as an aviator, baseball player, soldier and sailor.

Patsyette doll by Effanbee Wee Patsy dolls by Effanbee 9″ Patsyette (far left) & 6″ Wee Patsy are two of the smaller members of Patsy’s extended family. They were produced mostly as girls, but occasionally as boy-and-girl sets.

Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Patsy Babykin doll by Effanbee Patsy Patsy Babykin was the first all-composition baby in the Patsy line, in 1932. Prior to her introduction, there had been a cloth-bodied Patsy Baby available briefly. The all-compo version is marked Patsy Baby but was advertised and sold as Patsy Babykin.

Photos courtesy of Nancy McKee and Withington Auction, Inc.

Patsy Babyette doll by Effanbee Patsy Tinyette doll by Effanbee Patsy Babyette (far left) and Patsy Tinyette are the other babies in the Patsy family. Patsy Tinyette is marked Baby Tinyette but was never sold under that name by Effanbee. She was sold initially as a bent-leg baby, and later as a straight-leg toddler.

Tinyette photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Patricia doll by Effanbee Patricia, introduced in late 1934, was advertised as Patsy’s older sister. She is 15″ tall and has a different face from the other Patsy family girls. There were also dolls sold with Patsy marked heads and Patricia marked bodies; these are known as Patsy-Patricias by collectors.

Clippo the Clown marionette by Effanbee Clippo the Clown marionette by Effanbee Clippo the Clown (1937) is one of a series of marionettes designed by Virginia Austin. The others in the series are Emily Ann, Liza Lee and Lucifer. They have composition heads, hands and feet, with wooden body parts connected by cloth tape.

1625 Historical doll by Effanbee 1625 Historical doll by Effanbee The Historical Series of dolls are 14″ tall and represent different periods in American history. Pictured at left is the New York Settlement, 1625 doll. They were produced in 1939.

Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Effanbee Suzanne composition doll Effanbee Suzanne composition doll 14″ Suzanne (pictured) and 12″ Suzette are all-composition girl dolls made by Effanbee in the early 1940s. Suzette can have either painted eyes or sleep eyes. The same doll was also used for Effanbee’s Portrait Series.

Composition Brother doll by Effanbee Composition Brother doll by Effanbee Brother and his companion, Sister, were wartime dolls that had composition heads with cotton floss wigs and cloth bodies. A larger girl doll was made with the same construction as well.

Butin-nose doll by Effanbee Butin-nose doll by Effanbee Butin-Nose, sometimes called Betty Butin-nose, is an 8″ all composition doll with molded hair. She was sold in various outfits as well as international costumes, and was sometimes sold in pairs as a boy and girl.

Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Composition Candy Kid doll by Effanbee Candy Kid from 1946 is a 14″ all-composition molded hair toddler, who may be dressed as a boy or girl. A black version was made as well. Candy Kids were also made in vinyl in the ’50s.

Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Composition Mickey doll by Effanbee Mickey had a composition head and hands, and a cloth body. Some dolls had compo legs as well. Mickey was made in various sizes and often had flirty eyes. The same doll was also sold under the names Tommy Tucker and Baby Bright Eyes. Mickey had a twin sister too, sometimes called Katie and sometimes Janie, who wore a matching outfit. In the ’60s Effanbee sold a vinyl Mickey, who was a completely different doll.
Photo courtesy of Lisa Hanson. Check out Lisa’s eBay listings.

Little Lady dolls by Effanbee Little Lady dolls by Effanbee In 1935, the company entered into a contract with independent doll artist Dewees Cochran to design the American Children series of dolls. These dolls had hard rubber arms with separated fingers, with the rest of the doll made of composition. Effanbee continued this construction with their Little Lady (pictured left) dolls that sold through WWII.

Read about rubber, hard plastic, and vinyl dolls by Effanbee here.

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard