Oct 192012
 
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Cosmopolitan is best known for their 8″ hard plastic Ginger doll, a competitor of Vogue’s Ginny. She was introduced in 1954. The hard plastic Gingers underwent several changes during the course of production, which makes identification a little tricky.

Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Hard plastic Ginger wears outfit #883 from the 1955 North and South series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

Collectors should also be aware that Cosmopolitan sold Ginger bodies to other companies. The book “Small Dolls of the ’40s and ’50s” by Carol J. Stover gives detailed information on the Ginger variations.


Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Vinyl head Ginger wears outfit #444 from the 1955 Holiday Series. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

In 1957, they started making Ginger with a vinyl head. She also “grew up” with her new medium “cha cha” heels.


Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

That same year they entered the glamour doll market with 10.5″ Miss Ginger. Like Ginger, she had many extra outfits available. All-vinyl Miss Ginger is very similar to Little Miss Revlon and Miss Nancy Ann.


Little Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Little Miss Ginger wears Special Bride outfit #71 from 1958. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Little Miss Ginger also has a grown-up figure and extra outfits. She is also all vinyl. She is very similar to Little Miss Nancy Ann. Learn more on the Little Miss Ginger page.


Baby Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan

Most Baby Ginger dolls have rooted hair. This is a rare molded hair version. Photo courtesy of Tina Moreau. Check out her eBay listings.

8″ Baby Ginger is an all-vinyl drink and wet baby doll, similar to Vogue’s Ginnette. She, too, has an extensive wardrobe.

Copyright 2012 by Zendelle Bouchard

Sep 142011
 
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I picked this item up at an auction last night. This cardboard wardrobe measures 18.5″ tall, 12″ wide and 6″ deep. It has double doors on the front, a wooden bar to hang the clothes from, and another wooden bar holding up the shelf above. The colors and the logo on the top indicate that it was made for Cosmopolitan’s Ginger doll, a hard plastic toddler introduced in 1954, who was a competitor to Vogue’s Ginny doll.  I call it Ginger’s Mystery Closet because it is a mystery why an 8″ doll would have a wardrobe so huge. She has a wardrobe trunk that is in scale for her, about 9″ tall. Why would she need this behemoth? If you hung her little dresses on the rod, there would be several inches of empty space underneath. Any thoughts?