Zendelle

Mar 082016
 
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Dee an Cee’s 17″ Cindy was sold in the late 1950s in a variety of outfits, including a bridal gown.

Dee an Cee was a Canadian doll manufacturer from 1938 to 1964. The name was derived from the first letters of the last names of the two founders, Max Diamond and Morris Cone. The company motto was “Quality above all”.

This all original doll was received as a Christmas gift in 1939. She is 19 1/2″ tall, full composition with sleep eyes, open mouth with two teeth, Jointed at neck, shoulders and hips.

Through the 1940s, the company made composition dolls, mostly babies, including Snuggles, Sweetums and Little Darling. They briefly experimented with rubber dolls before switching over to vinyl beginning in 1949.

Many of the their products were licensed from U.S. companies and made from the original molds. They held the Canadian licenses to produce Mattel’s Chatty Cathy and Alexander’s Marybel. Sometimes the dolls names were changed; American Character’s Baby Dear was sold by Dee an Cee as Dream Baby, while Mattel’s Scooba-Doo became Kookie in Canada.
The company produced their own original dolls too. Mandy and Dusty, designed by Morris Cone, were black brother and sister dolls with realistic features and molded hair, first produced in 1956.

Dee an Cee was the first Canadian doll company to advertise on television. After the firm was sold to Mattel in 1962, manufacturing in Canada was gradually discontinued. The name was no longer used after 1964.

Dee an Cee dolls show a variety of markings, including D&C, Dee an Cee, Dee and Cee, and DEE & CEE.

Visit these pages to learn more about Dee an Cee dolls:

 


Copyright 2000-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Little Miss Ginger Doll by Cosmopolitan (1958-?)

 Cosmopolitan  Comments Off on Little Miss Ginger Doll by Cosmopolitan (1958-?)
Mar 062016
 
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Little Miss Ginger doll by Cosmopolitan wearing red cotton dress with white teardrop print, white lace at hem, wide white organdy collar; also came with a red net hat with white flowers; white “Little Miss Ginger” purse; hose; white shoes.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller hug*a*pug.

Beginning in 1958, Cosmopolitan advertised Little Miss Ginger as “the only all vinyl eight inch slim doll” and she was in fact the tiniest of the vinyl glamour dolls. Shortly afterward, Nancy Ann Storybook Dolls introduced their eight inch Little Miss Nancy Ann who appears to have been made from the same molds. Other copycats followed, including Woolworth’s Little Miss Marie.



Body Construction
Little Miss Ginger has a rigid vinyl body with softer vinyl head. She is jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. Her blonde, red, or brunette hair is rooted and styled into a short fluffy bob. She has gray or brown sleep eyes with molded lashes and brown painted lashes at the outer corner of each eye. Her red lips match her red finger- and toenails. The vinyl on these dolls tends to pale or darken over time, with the result that different parts of her body may be different colors.

Markings
This doll is well marked and easy to identify. She is marked “Ginger” on the back of her neck and “Little Miss Ginger” on her back. Under each arm and inside each thigh she is marked “LMG”.

Clothing
Little Miss Ginger was available as a basic doll in white, black or red bra, panties and shoes. She was also sold dressed in various outfits. One piece of clothing from each outfit is tagged “Fashions for Little/Miss Ginger/Cosmopolitan Doll & Toy Co./ Jamaica, NY U.S.A”.

Yellow cotton sleeveless top with lace trim; black cotton skirt with yellow and gray print and yellow elastic waistband; shoes, possibly yellow or black.



White fuzzy long sleeve sweater with rick rack accent on front; black velveteen skirt with rick rack accent and red taffeta lining; matching hat; red taffeta panties; ice skates.



Navy polished cotton dress with white polka dots, white organdy collar; navy shoes.



Pink cotton dress with large white polka dots; shoes, probably white. Also available as a pale pink dress with darker pink polka dots.



Peach majorette dress with long sleeves, trimmed in white/green/peach braid; matching hat with green feather; gold boots. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.



Pale yellow flocked nylon and tulle dress with black ribbon bow. Braid hat and purse trimmed with flowers. Photo courtesy of eBay seller hug*a*pug.



#71 Special Bride outfit includes lace trimmed tulle gown with taffeta bodice, separate taffeta and tulle slip, wrist corsage, tulle veil, white panties, white heels.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller hug*a*pug.



Other outfits for Little Miss Ginger include:

  • #52 Bolero Plaid Dress is a white, blue and black large scale plaid taffeta dress and black bolero jacket lined in matching fabric.
  • White cotton dress with black and red print, red puffed sleeves.
  • Pink satin strapless evening gown; corsage of pink flowers; pink hose; pink heels.
  • Beige faux fur coat, hat and muff.
  • Red, white, green and black plaid taffeta dress with red ribbon sash; matching plaid hair bow with red ribbon and hairpin; white panties; red shoes.
  • White taffeta dress with turquoise and pink floral print; black hair (?) ribbon; white panties; hose; black shoes.
    Navy, blue and white plaid v-necked dress.
  • White vinyl raincoat with red trim, hood and belt; white shoes.
  • Red pants trimmed with white; white blouse with red ribbon; white shoes.
  • Navy blue jacket with white cuffs; navy circle skirt; white top.





Learn More:

cover
Small Dolls
of the 40s & 50s
by Carol Stover
Find it on eBay.
cover
Dolls & Accessories of the 1950s
by Dian Zillner
Find it on eBay.
cover
Glamour Dolls
of the 1950s & 1960s
by Polly & Pam Judd
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 1999-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Vogue Doll Company

 Vogue  Comments Off on Vogue Doll Company
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Beautiful hard plastic Ginny doll in her original trunk with outfits.

Vogue Dolls was responsible for some of the loveliest and most popular dolls of the 20th century. The company was at its height in the 1950s, when Ginny and Ginnette were imitated by nearly every other doll company in America, clamoring for a share of the market for 8″ dolls and their fashions.

Jennie Graves of Somerville, Massachusetts, began her career in the doll business in 1925 by buying nude dolls, dressing them, and selling them through department stores in the Boston area. She soon hired neighborhood women as home sewers to keep up with demand, and opened her own store, the Vogue Doll Shoppe. Throughout the twenties, thirties and forties, Mrs. Graves purchased dolls from other companies to dress. She began with German bisque head dolls, but soon added celluloid dolls as well as American-made composition, rubber, and even cloth dolls to her lineup. The composition dolls dressed by Vogue were made by Ideal, Arranbee and Madame Alexander.


Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Dora Lee was made from the mid 1930s to 1940s. She is 11″ tall, all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. She is unmarked.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Composition Sportswomen doll by Vogue The Sportswomen Series of 14″ dolls includes a Golfer, Tennis Player and Skater in addition to the Skier pictured at left. They are all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips, with lovely mohair wigs and high color faces.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Cynthia was made in 13″ and 18″ sizes. She is all compo and represents a little girl with a chubbier face and body than Dora Lee or the Sportswomen dolls. Some Cynthia dolls have a close mouth and other have an open mouth with teeth.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Composition Linda doll by Vogue Composition Linda doll by Vogue 19″ Linda is from the 1940s. She may have been part of a series of three “My Sisters and Me” dolls with 13″ Cynthia and 8″ Me (Toddles) dressed in matching outfits. Like most Vogue composition dolls, her name is stamped on the sole of her shoe.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


_waacette (2K) _wave2 (5K) WAAC-ette and WAVE-ette were produced during World War II wearing replicas of the official uniforms of the women’s branches of the US military services. The 13″ composition toddler dolls were possibly produced by Ideal and/or Arranbee. Both closed mouth and open mouth dolls were used. They wear cotton dresses underneath cotton coats (navy blue for WAVE-ette and brown for WAAC-ette), matching hats with military insignia, cotton stockings, tie shoes, and shoulder bags with the letters U.S.A.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Toddles doll by Vogue Toddles doll by Vogue

In 1937, Mrs. Graves began buying 8″ composition dolls from R&B. This was Toddles. After a few years she had renowned doll designed Bernard Lipfert sculpt a new version of the doll. Toddles continued to be made until 1948, when the company switched to hard plastic.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_fgm2 (3K) _fgm1 (3K) This 8″ hard plastic doll was the precursor to Ginny, who became the most popular doll of the 1950s. During this period, the dolls were sold with individual names (pictured at left is Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother) but by the end of 1952, the dolls had become universally known as Ginny. In 1950 the dolls began to be made with sleep eyes.


_nm_brun5 (2K) _nm_lace2 (2K) _nm_ginny1 (3K) In 1952, Ginny began to be sold as a basic doll in her underwear, with outfits available separately. Since Mrs. Graves’ main focus from the beginning had been on Vogue’s beautiful, well made clothing, this was a stroke of genius. Little mothers could now dress their doll for all occasions in everything from day dresses to formal wear to blue jeans. Ginny’s fabulous wardrobe made her the most popular doll of the 1950s.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls



Vogue had produced a baby doll called Velva from 1948 to 1951, with a composition head and stuffed latex rubber body. The doll was discontinued when it became apparent that the latex would begin to deteriorate after a few years, and in any case, the company wanted to concentrate all its resources on Ginny.


Ginnette by Vogue Dolls, Inc. But by 1955 they were ready to add more dolls to the lineup, and Ginnette, an 8″ vinyl baby doll was introduced. She was promoted as “Ginny’s baby sister.” Of course, she had extra fashions too. Ginnette was a popular doll, and like Ginny before her, was copied by many other companies.
Photo courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


_jillad (4K) _vinyljil (1K) In 1957 the family grew again with the addition of “Ginny’s big sister,” Jill, a 10.5″ high-heeled fashion doll with jointed knees. Like her little sisters, she had clothes for every occasion. The hard plastic version of Jill was made through 1960; then in 1962 and ’63, a vinyl version, called All New Jill (pictured at left) was produced.


_ns_jeff (2K) _ns_jan1 (3K) In 1958 and ’59, Vogue grew Ginny’s family again with the additions of 11″ Jeff and and 10.5″ Jan. Both dolls were all vinyl. Jan was meant to be a friend for Jill, while Jeff could be either Jill’s boyfriend or Ginny’s big brother. They were only made for a couple of years. In 1963-64, a new 12″ version of Jan was made, first called Loveable Jan and then Sweetheart Jan. Those later Jan dolls are much harder to find today.


Ginny Baby was introduced as an 18″ all vinyl baby doll in 1959. Over the years, she was made in several sizes. For a few years in the 1960s, Vogue made an 8″ version that is virtually identical to Ginnette. Ginny Baby was made in both rooted hair and molded hair versions. The boxed doll at left is 16″ tall and dates between 1966 and 1971.


Littlest Angel by Vogue Doll Co. Littlest Angel doll by Vogue In 1958, Vogue purchased the Arranbee Doll Co. and further expanded their line with dolls such as Littlest Angel, who was produced with a vinyl head and hard plastic body beginning in 1961. The doll at left is the later all-vinyl version, made from 1967-74. A third version, available through 1980, has a slightly different face. Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Brikette was a licensed copy of an Italian doll made by Bonomi. Vogue’s 22″ version was introduced in 1959 and bright orange hair, flirty green eyes and a ball-jointed waist. A year later they introduced a 16″ version who didn’t have the flirty eyes. Platinum blonde and brunette dolls were added to the line as well. She had extra outfits available. The original version of Brikette was made for two years, but was reintroduced in 1979 in a very different version.


Li'l Imp doll by Vogue Li’l Imp is a Littlest Angel doll with orange hair, green eyes and freckles. She was marketed as “Brikette’s kid sister.” She is 11″ tall, with a vinyl head and hard plastic bent-knee walker body. She is marked “R&B” on her head and body.


Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Baby Dear was designed by children’s book illustrator Eloise Wilkin. The original version, produced from 1960-64, is a realistic looking baby with vinyl head and floppy limbs, painted eyes, and a cloth body. She was made in 18″ and 12″ sizes.


Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue In 1964, Baby Dear was redesigned with a new head with sleep eyes. In 1965, she was redesigned again and this final version, pictured at left, was produced until 1980.


Vintage Li'l Dear doll by Vogue The “Dear” line was also expanded with other dolls including Baby Dear One, Too Dear and 8″ Li’l Dear, pictured at left. She has the same head as the smallest version of Ginny Baby, but with the floppy cloth body of Baby Dear.



Mrs. Graves retired in 1960 and her daughter Virginia Carlson took over the company. She in turn retired six years later and her brother-in-law, Edwin Nelson became president of Vogue.


In 1972, Vogue was sold to the Tonka Corporation. They continued to produce Ginny in Far Away Lands outfits, as well as Baby Dear, Littlest Angel and Ginny Baby. They also introduced a few new dolls to the line, including Wash-a-Bye Baby and Precious Baby. Photo of Scotland Ginny courtesy of eBay seller king-auctions.


In 1977, Lesney Products purchased the rights to Vogue’s trademarks from Tonka. One of the lines they produced were the Glitter Girls, 5 1/2″ fashion dolls with extra outfits.



The company changed hands a few more times until it was purchased by the present owners in 1995, and re-launched under the name Vogue Doll Co. Today, the company focuses on Ginny dolls, in classic and contemporary styles, for children as well as collectors. They have introduced a new version of Jill as well. Visit their website at www.voguedolls.com.

If you are interested in learning more about Jill, Jan and Jeff, visit Vicki Broadhurst’s Vogue Jill website.






Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Vogue Dolls
by Judith Izen & Carol Stover
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.



Copyright 2006-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Dolls by Unknown Manufacturers

 Unknown  Comments Off on Dolls by Unknown Manufacturers
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Cloth doll from the 1939 World’s Fair with mask face and googly eyes. Courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

In this section, dolls whose origin is unknown or uncertain are pictured and described, in an effort to aid in their identification and the collector’s enjoyment of them.

Individual doll pages:

Vinyl


Hard Plastic


Composition


Cloth




Copyright 1997-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Uneeda Doll Company

 Uneeda  Comments Off on Uneeda Doll Company
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Walking and Talking Miki dolls from Uneeda’s 1975 catalog.

Uneeda Doll Company, based in New York, has manufactured a wide variety of dolls since 1917. They are best known for their ’50s and ’60s vinyl dolls; multi-jointed Dollikin, fashion dolls Suzette and Miss Suzette, the miniature Pee Wees line and the unusual Little Sophisticates series.

Collecting Uneeda dolls can be confusing, as the company often used the same names for different dolls.

Visit these pages to see photos and descriptions of Uneeda dolls:

See also:





Learn More:

cover
Twentieth Century Dolls
by Johana Gast Anderton
Find it on eBay.
cover
More Twentieth Century Dolls
from Bisque to Vinyl
by Johana Gast Anderton
Find it on eBay.
cover
Baby-Boomer Dolls
by Michele Karl
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2013-16 by Zendelle Bouchard