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Vogue Doll Company

 Vogue  Comments Off on Vogue Doll Company
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Beautiful hard plastic Ginny doll in her original trunk with outfits.

Vogue Dolls was responsible for some of the loveliest and most popular dolls of the 20th century. The company was at its height in the 1950s, when Ginny and Ginnette were imitated by nearly every other doll company in America, clamoring for a share of the market for 8″ dolls and their fashions.

Jennie Graves of Somerville, Massachusetts, began her career in the doll business in 1925 by buying nude dolls, dressing them, and selling them through department stores in the Boston area. She soon hired neighborhood women as home sewers to keep up with demand, and opened her own store, the Vogue Doll Shoppe. Throughout the twenties, thirties and forties, Mrs. Graves purchased dolls from other companies to dress. She began with German bisque head dolls, but soon added celluloid dolls as well as American-made composition, rubber, and even cloth dolls to her lineup. The composition dolls dressed by Vogue were made by Ideal, Arranbee and Madame Alexander.


Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Composition Dora Lee doll by Vogue Dora Lee was made from the mid 1930s to 1940s. She is 11″ tall, all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips. She is unmarked.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Composition Sportswomen doll by Vogue The Sportswomen Series of 14″ dolls includes a Golfer, Tennis Player and Skater in addition to the Skier pictured at left. They are all composition, jointed at the neck, shoulders and hips, with lovely mohair wigs and high color faces.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Composition Cynthia doll by Vogue Cynthia was made in 13″ and 18″ sizes. She is all compo and represents a little girl with a chubbier face and body than Dora Lee or the Sportswomen dolls. Some Cynthia dolls have a close mouth and other have an open mouth with teeth.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Composition Linda doll by Vogue Composition Linda doll by Vogue 19″ Linda is from the 1940s. She may have been part of a series of three “My Sisters and Me” dolls with 13″ Cynthia and 8″ Me (Toddles) dressed in matching outfits. Like most Vogue composition dolls, her name is stamped on the sole of her shoe.
Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


_waacette (2K) _wave2 (5K) WAAC-ette and WAVE-ette were produced during World War II wearing replicas of the official uniforms of the women’s branches of the US military services. The 13″ composition toddler dolls were possibly produced by Ideal and/or Arranbee. Both closed mouth and open mouth dolls were used. They wear cotton dresses underneath cotton coats (navy blue for WAVE-ette and brown for WAAC-ette), matching hats with military insignia, cotton stockings, tie shoes, and shoulder bags with the letters U.S.A.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Toddles doll by Vogue Toddles doll by Vogue

In 1937, Mrs. Graves began buying 8″ composition dolls from R&B. This was Toddles. After a few years she had renowned doll designed Bernard Lipfert sculpt a new version of the doll. Toddles continued to be made until 1948, when the company switched to hard plastic.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


_fgm2 (3K) _fgm1 (3K) This 8″ hard plastic doll was the precursor to Ginny, who became the most popular doll of the 1950s. During this period, the dolls were sold with individual names (pictured at left is Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother) but by the end of 1952, the dolls had become universally known as Ginny. In 1950 the dolls began to be made with sleep eyes.


_nm_brun5 (2K) _nm_lace2 (2K) _nm_ginny1 (3K) In 1952, Ginny began to be sold as a basic doll in her underwear, with outfits available separately. Since Mrs. Graves’ main focus from the beginning had been on Vogue’s beautiful, well made clothing, this was a stroke of genius. Little mothers could now dress their doll for all occasions in everything from day dresses to formal wear to blue jeans. Ginny’s fabulous wardrobe made her the most popular doll of the 1950s.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls



Vogue had produced a baby doll called Velva from 1948 to 1951, with a composition head and stuffed latex rubber body. The doll was discontinued when it became apparent that the latex would begin to deteriorate after a few years, and in any case, the company wanted to concentrate all its resources on Ginny.


Ginnette by Vogue Dolls, Inc. But by 1955 they were ready to add more dolls to the lineup, and Ginnette, an 8″ vinyl baby doll was introduced. She was promoted as “Ginny’s baby sister.” Of course, she had extra fashions too. Ginnette was a popular doll, and like Ginny before her, was copied by many other companies.
Photo courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


_jillad (4K) _vinyljil (1K) In 1957 the family grew again with the addition of “Ginny’s big sister,” Jill, a 10.5″ high-heeled fashion doll with jointed knees. Like her little sisters, she had clothes for every occasion. The hard plastic version of Jill was made through 1960; then in 1962 and ’63, a vinyl version, called All New Jill (pictured at left) was produced.


_ns_jeff (2K) _ns_jan1 (3K) In 1958 and ’59, Vogue grew Ginny’s family again with the additions of 11″ Jeff and and 10.5″ Jan. Both dolls were all vinyl. Jan was meant to be a friend for Jill, while Jeff could be either Jill’s boyfriend or Ginny’s big brother. They were only made for a couple of years. In 1963-64, a new 12″ version of Jan was made, first called Loveable Jan and then Sweetheart Jan. Those later Jan dolls are much harder to find today.


Ginny Baby was introduced as an 18″ all vinyl baby doll in 1959. Over the years, she was made in several sizes. For a few years in the 1960s, Vogue made an 8″ version that is virtually identical to Ginnette. Ginny Baby was made in both rooted hair and molded hair versions. The boxed doll at left is 16″ tall and dates between 1966 and 1971.


Littlest Angel by Vogue Doll Co. Littlest Angel doll by Vogue In 1958, Vogue purchased the Arranbee Doll Co. and further expanded their line with dolls such as Littlest Angel, who was produced with a vinyl head and hard plastic body beginning in 1961. The doll at left is the later all-vinyl version, made from 1967-74. A third version, available through 1980, has a slightly different face. Photos courtesy of American Beauty Dolls Shop.


Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Vintage Brikette doll by Vogue Brikette was a licensed copy of an Italian doll made by Bonomi. Vogue’s 22″ version was introduced in 1959 and bright orange hair, flirty green eyes and a ball-jointed waist. A year later they introduced a 16″ version who didn’t have the flirty eyes. Platinum blonde and brunette dolls were added to the line as well. She had extra outfits available. The original version of Brikette was made for two years, but was reintroduced in 1979 in a very different version.


Li'l Imp doll by Vogue Li’l Imp is a Littlest Angel doll with orange hair, green eyes and freckles. She was marketed as “Brikette’s kid sister.” She is 11″ tall, with a vinyl head and hard plastic bent-knee walker body. She is marked “R&B” on her head and body.


Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Baby Dear was designed by children’s book illustrator Eloise Wilkin. The original version, produced from 1960-64, is a realistic looking baby with vinyl head and floppy limbs, painted eyes, and a cloth body. She was made in 18″ and 12″ sizes.


Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue Vintage Baby Dear doll by Vogue In 1964, Baby Dear was redesigned with a new head with sleep eyes. In 1965, she was redesigned again and this final version, pictured at left, was produced until 1980.


Vintage Li'l Dear doll by Vogue The “Dear” line was also expanded with other dolls including Baby Dear One, Too Dear and 8″ Li’l Dear, pictured at left. She has the same head as the smallest version of Ginny Baby, but with the floppy cloth body of Baby Dear.



Mrs. Graves retired in 1960 and her daughter Virginia Carlson took over the company. She in turn retired six years later and her brother-in-law, Edwin Nelson became president of Vogue.


In 1972, Vogue was sold to the Tonka Corporation. They continued to produce Ginny in Far Away Lands outfits, as well as Baby Dear, Littlest Angel and Ginny Baby. They also introduced a few new dolls to the line, including Wash-a-Bye Baby and Precious Baby. Photo of Scotland Ginny courtesy of eBay seller king-auctions.


In 1977, Lesney Products purchased the rights to Vogue’s trademarks from Tonka. One of the lines they produced were the Glitter Girls, 5 1/2″ fashion dolls with extra outfits.



The company changed hands a few more times until it was purchased by the present owners in 1995, and re-launched under the name Vogue Doll Co. Today, the company focuses on Ginny dolls, in classic and contemporary styles, for children as well as collectors. They have introduced a new version of Jill as well. Visit their website at www.voguedolls.com.

If you are interested in learning more about Jill, Jan and Jeff, visit Vicki Broadhurst’s Vogue Jill website.






Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Vogue Dolls
by Judith Izen & Carol Stover
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.



Copyright 2006-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard.

Dolls by Unknown Manufacturers

 Unknown  Comments Off on Dolls by Unknown Manufacturers
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Cloth doll from the 1939 World’s Fair with mask face and googly eyes. Courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

In this section, dolls whose origin is unknown or uncertain are pictured and described, in an effort to aid in their identification and the collector’s enjoyment of them.

Individual doll pages:

Vinyl


Hard Plastic


Composition


Cloth




Copyright 1997-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Uneeda Doll Company

 Uneeda  Comments Off on Uneeda Doll Company
Mar 032016
 
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Above: Walking and Talking Miki dolls from Uneeda’s 1975 catalog.

Uneeda Doll Company, based in New York, has manufactured a wide variety of dolls since 1917. They are best known for their ’50s and ’60s vinyl dolls; multi-jointed Dollikin, fashion dolls Suzette and Miss Suzette, the miniature Pee Wees line and the unusual Little Sophisticates series.

Collecting Uneeda dolls can be confusing, as the company often used the same names for different dolls.

Visit these pages to see photos and descriptions of Uneeda dolls:

See also:





Learn More:

cover
Twentieth Century Dolls
by Johana Gast Anderton
Find it on eBay.
cover
More Twentieth Century Dolls
from Bisque to Vinyl
by Johana Gast Anderton
Find it on eBay.
cover
Baby-Boomer Dolls
by Michele Karl
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2013-16 by Zendelle Bouchard

Advertising Dolls

 Advertising  Comments Off on Advertising Dolls
Mar 032016
 
Aunt Jemima, from 1929, and the Cream of Wheat chef, from 1930, were both sold as fabric panels to be stitched and stuffed at home.
Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.
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Advertising dolls provide an interesting look at the history of consumer products in America. Who remembers Force cereal, Blatz beer or Fletcher’s Castoria? But through their advertising and trademark characters, these products will live forever.

Most advertising dolls are made of cloth, simple “pancake” dolls with one piece for the front and one for the back, stitched together and stuffed. Some were printed on fabric and sold by the piece, to be stitched and stuffed at home. But there are advertising dolls of all materials, including vinyl, hard plastic, composition and even cast iron.

There are several types of advertising dolls. The most popular and familiar dolls promote the company’s trademark character. This might be Tony the Tiger for Frosted Flakes cereal; the Campbell Kids for Campbell’s Soup; or Aunt Jemima for the pancake mix made by Quaker Oats. Another type of advertising doll is the licensed doll. This doll, like Ideal’s Little Miss Revlon or Toni by Ideal and American Character, incorporates the name and concept of the product without actually being used in the company’s own advertising. The least desirable type of advertising doll is the premium doll, which is used by the company to sell product (“Send in 3 boxtops and 25 cents”) but otherwise has no connection to the product. One example of this type is the Fun Fair clown offered by Kellogg’s in 1973. A fourth type of advertising doll, and the hardest to find, are the dolls that were not made available to the general public, but used solely as display pieces in stores. One example is the RCA Victor Sellin’ Fool doll made to be displayed in RCA dealerships in the ’20s. The doll was based on an illustration by Maxfield Parrish and is very hard to find today.

Advertising dolls are still being sold today, although they are far more likely to take the form of teddy bears than dolls.

Click on a photo to view a larger image.


Ceresota Flour advertising doll Ceresota Flour advertising doll Two slightly different variations of the Ceresota Boy from 1912,
advertising the company’s flour. This is a cut and sew doll, beautifully printed in oil colors. His hat brim gives three dimensional interest.


Kellogg's Johnny 
Bear advertising doll Kellogg’s 10″ Johnny Bear dates from 1926. The cut and sew panel was
available for 10 cents plus one box top from Kellogg’s cereals. He was part of a set with
Goldilocks, Papa Bear and Mama Bear.


Aunt Jemima advertising doll Aunt Jemima is one of the most recognizable trademark characters in
American history. She and her family have been made in doll form since 1895. This cut and sew version is from 1929.


_hotpoint1 (2K) _hotpoint2 (3K) This rare Hotpoint character has a composition head and segmented wood body. He was probably made by Cameo, as they made other dolls in this style. He dates from about 1930 and may have been a store display or promotional doll. Photo courtesy of eBay seller lchristoo.


Freckles the Frog advertising doll for Kellogg's Dinkey the Dog advertising doll for Kellogg's Freckles the Frog and Dinkey the Dog are from a 1935 series of four animal cut-and-sew dolls. The others are Dandy the Duck and Crinkles the Cat. They were available from Kellogg’s for 10 cents plus one Wheat Krispies box top each, or 25 cents and four box tops for the whole set. Each doll is about 12″ tall.


Captain Bill and Stewardess Sue, “the Mainliner Dolls” were produced by the Toyad Corp. of Latrobe, PA in 1940 as a tie-in with United Airlines. They are 7″ tall, made of rubber, and were sold in stores as a set for $1.00.


Cliquot Club advertising doll Kleeko the Eskimo was the trademark character for Cliquot Club beverages. This doll is stuffed vinyl fabric, date unknown, but probably mid-twentieth century.


Fab Picture Doll Colgate Palmolive’s 8″ Fab Picture Doll was a premium for Fab Detergent. She was
available for $1 plus one Fab box top in 1957.


Gillette licensed the name of its Toni home permanent twice to doll companies. The first Toni doll (shown left) was a hard plastic girl doll made by Ideal in the early fifties. The second doll was a vinyl glamour doll made by American Character in the late fifties. Both dolls were sold in several sizes, and came with a Toni playwave kit for styling the doll’s hair. The 10″ version (shown right) of the American Character Toni had many extra outfits which could be purchased separately.


_jantzen (3K) The Janzten Girl was a 10.5″ vinyl high heeled doll sold by Valentine in 1957 as a tie in to Jantzen clothing. She came with a complete wardrobe of clothing.


Ideal Little Miss Revlon doll Ideal’s Revlon Doll (shown far left), available in four sizes, and 10″ Little Miss Revlon licensed the name of the cosmetics line in the late 1950s. They are very high quality dolls, and were widely imitated.


Polly Ponds advertising doll Polly Ponds Beauty Doll and Polly Ponds Bride Doll were made by Citro Manufacturing in the late fities or early sixties, as a tie in to Ponds Cold Cream. She is 24″ tall.


_badboy31 (3K) Little Mr. Bad Boy was produced by Earle Pullan and other Canadian companies in 1961 as a promotion for the Bad Boy Furniture Company. Photo courtesy of eBay seller Connectibles.


Miss Babbitt advertising doll for Bab-O Cleanser Miss Babbitt is a strange doll that combines a hard plastic Ginny-type head on a slim vinyl fashion doll body. She was offered by Bab-O Cleanser in the early sixties.


Elsie the Cow doll Vintage Elsie the Cow doll Elsie has been the spokescow of the Borden Company since 1937. She was first made in a 15″ plush version with vinyl head in the 1950s. The doll pictured has the same vinyl head, but a woven cloth body, and she is 21″ tall. She is missing her hat, collar and shoes. Her date of manufacture is unknown. Elsie’s calves Beauregard, Latabee and Lobelia have also been made. Photos courtesy of eBay seller art-in-mind.


Vermont Maid advertising doll Vermont Maid is a 15″ vinyl doll made by Uneeda in 1964 for Vermont Maid Syrup. She is marked “U // 16” on the back of her head.


Brunswick Corp. advertising doll This bizarre cloth doll from 1968 was one of four offered by the Brunswick Corporation to promote bowling.


Tony the Tiger advertising doll This is the first version of Tony the Tiger, offered by Kellogg’s Sugar Frosted Flakes in 1970. He is 13″ tall with a fabric head and furry body.


Hardees advertising doll Gilbert Giddyup Gilbert Giddyup is a stuffed cloth doll that was available from Hardee’s restaurants in 1971.


First edition Ronald McDonald doll Ronald McDonald, the face of McDonald’s Corporation, has been made in doll form since 1971. The doll pictured is the first version of Ronald. He is a 16″ stuffed cloth doll and was available only from the restaurants. The following year a Hamburglar doll was offered. In 1976, Remco made vinyl versions of all the McDonald’s characters for sale in retail stores. Photo courtesy of eBay seller silverknight52.


_campbell- (4K) Campbell Kid advertising doll Campbell Kid advertising doll Campbell Kids dolls have been made in many different materials over several decades. The pair of 10″ vinyl dolls at far left dates from 1971, and were available for $2 each plus two soup labels. The 16.5″ cloth dolls shown were sold at retail stores in 1973. Photos of cloth dolls courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.


Vintage Charlie the Tuna advertising doll Vintage Charlie the Tuna advertising doll Charlie the Tuna, Starkist’s clueless trademark character, was available in several different cloth premium versions in the 1970s. The vinyl figure shown was probably sold in retail stores, and is also from that era. He was made by Product People, Inc. More recently, Charlie has been made in beanie and plush versions. Photos courtesy of eBay seller art-in-mind.


Kellogg's Fun Fair Clown advertising doll

Kellogg’s offered three different Fun Fair Clowns as premiums in 1973.


Texaco Cheerleader advertising doll The Texaco Cheerleader doll was sold at Texaco gas stations in 1973. She is a Barbie-sized doll, and is marked Hong Kong. Photo courtesy of eBay seller art-in-mind.


Disney Premium dolls for Closeup Toothpaste Closeup Toothpaste offered 6 vinyl Disney Characters as premiums in 1974.


Tropicana advertising doll 17″ Tropic-Ana cloth doll was offered for $2.00 on cartons of orange juice in 1977.


Vintage Gerber Baby doll from 1989
Vintage Gerber Baby doll by Atlanta Novelty The Gerber Baby has been made in several different versions by various companies since 1936. The dolls pictured each have a vinyl head and limbs on a cloth body. The doll at far left, made by Atlanta Novelty in 1979, is 17″ long with flirty eyes that look from side to side. The doll at near left is from 1989, made by Lucky Industrial. She is 16″ long and has sleep eyes with very stiff lashes, and strange orange lip paint. Photo of 1979 doll courtesy of Martin Auction Co.


Wrangler advertising doll by Ertl Wrangler advertising doll by Ertl Wrangler advertising doll by Ertl Missy and The Wrangler advertised Wrangler clothing. They were made by Ertl in the early 1980s. They are 11.5″ tall and each had a few extra outfits. Photos courtesy of eBay seller franklin2000.


Bluebonnet Sue Advertising Doll Bluebonnet Sue Advertising Doll Blue Bonnet Sue is 11″ tall, made of a soft knit fabric, softly stuffed. She has yellow yarn hair in a ponytail and printed features. She is made to sit. She wears a removable outfit of blue print dress with satin ribbon trim and attached apron, and matching bonnet, with white panty underneath. Her shoes are of woven blue fabric to look like shoes, with sewn on satin straps. She was made by Dakin in 1986 for Nabisco, to promote their Blue Bonnet Margarine.


Snap, Crackle & Pop advertising dolls by Product People Snap, Crackle and Pop are the trademark characters for Kellogg’s Rice Krispies cereal. The little elves were designed by illustrator Vernon Grant in the 1930s and have been made several times in doll form. The dolls shown are by Product People and probably date to the 1980s. The same dolls in different boxes are shown here on Amazon.com.
Photo courtesy of eBay seller art-in-mind.


Mr. Handy Andy advertising doll 1980s Mr. Handy Andy advertising doll 1980s Handy Andy Home Improvement Centers was a midwestern US chain of big-box hardware stores that was in business from 1980 until 1996. Mr. Handy Andy is a plush doll about 14″ tall with faux fur hair, eyebrows and moustache. He wears denim jeans, a red shirt and green vest.
Photos courtesy of eBay seller art-in-mind.


Swiss Miss advertising doll, circa 1990 There have been at least four different dolls made to advertise Swiss Miss Cocoa. The first two came out in 1962 – you can see them here on the Jolly Toys page. In 1977, there was a cloth version, and in 1990, they issued the 14″ doll pictured at left, who has a vinyl head and hands on a cloth body, with yarn hair.





Learn More:

Advertising Dolls by Robison & Sellers
Advertising Dolls:
Identification & Value Guide
by Joleen Ashman Robison
& Kay Sellers
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.
Advertising Dolls by Myra Yellin Outwater
Advertising Dolls
by Myra Yellin Outwater
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.
Zany Characters of the Ad World by M.J. Lamphier
Zany Characters
of the Ad World
by Mary Jane Lamphier
More info from Amazon
or
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2006-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard

Polly Ponds Dolls by Citro Manufacturing Co. Inc. (1950s)

 Citro  Comments Off on Polly Ponds Dolls by Citro Manufacturing Co. Inc. (1950s)
Feb 222016
 
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Citro Manufacturing was located in Brooklyn, New York. They made the 24″ stuffed vinyl Polly Pond’s Bride Doll and Polly Pond’s Beauty Doll, which were advertising tie-ins to Ponds Cold Cream.


Polly Ponds Bride Doll minus her veil.

Body Construction
Both dolls are 24″ tall, with a stuffed vinyl body and soft vinyl head. Their lovely creamy skin tone suits their role as an advertising doll for Pond’s Cold Cream. They are jointed only at the neck, with some type of rigid cylindrical (possibly metal) piece inside her neck which prevents her head from flopping over. They have blue sleep eyes with brush lashes. The Bride has three painted lashes above the outer corner of each eye. Her rooted blonde hair is style in a short curly bubble cut. Her fingernails are painted red, but her toenails are bare. This doll does not have earring holes. The Beauty Doll has painted lashes below her eyes, longer lemon-blonde hair pulled back from her face, unpainted fingernails and pierced ears.

Markings
These dolls are completely unmarked.

Clothing
The Bride wears a long sleeved bridal gown of white taffeta and net with silver threads running through it, trimmed with silver lace; a petticoat of a sort of stiff cheesecloth type fabric which ties at the back; white knit panties; and white plastic heels. On her head she wears a veil made from a circle of white net trimmed with white lace. She carries a bouquet of lilies-of-the-valley. Her dress is untagged, and is fastened at the back with safety pins – no snaps, buttons or other fasteners appear to have been used.

Polly Pond’s Beauty Doll wears a white blouse with short puffed sleeves and a lace trimmed rounded collar with a red bow, and a black and multicolor striped jumper. Underneath she wears a white taffeta slip and panties, and nylon stockings. She has black plastic heels and pearl drop earrings.

The Polly Ponds Beauty Doll has lovely lemon blonde hair.

Packaging
The Polly Pond’s Bride Doll comes packaged in a white corrugated cardboard box with red printing. She comes with a little booklet extolling her virtues. It has a price of $21.95, which seems like a high price for what is actually an inexpensively made doll. The box also advertises a Polly Pond’s Bridesmaid Doll, but whether this doll was actually made is unknown. See photo below.



Copyright 2000-2016 by Zendelle Bouchard