Zendelle

Nov 182014
 
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Bisque and china dolls are both made of porcelain. Bisque is unglazed, while china has a shiny glazed finish. While the vast majority of bisque dolls that interest collectors would be classified as antique rather than vintage, there are quite a few bisque and china dolls that fit well into a vintage collection.

Photos courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

At the start of the 20th century, the majority of bisque and china dolls were made in Germany. Most of these were similar to the dolls that had been produced there for decades. But early in the 20th century, bisque dolls began to appear that had a decidedly modern look. These were the Kewpies, and they were designed by American illustrator Rose O’Neill. George Borgfeldt & Co., an American distributor, hired sculptor Joseph Kallus to turn the Kewpies into three dimensional dolls, and outsourced their manufacture to Germany. The Kewpies and their wide-eyed “googly” look were all the rage, and they were copied by many other companies. The Kewpies have been made in every material possible, and are still popular today.

German firms continued to produce bisque dolls until World War II, when the factories were converted for use in the war effort. Some of these were German designs and others were produced, like the Kewpies, for American companies. The two dolls pictured are painted bisque – the color is not fired on and probably date from the 1920s. The doll above left is a doll house size. The one on the right is a “Betty Boop” type, more commonly made in Japan.

Many vintage bisque dolls were made in Japan during the ‘teens, twenties and thirties. If they are marked “Nippon”, like the boy in blue above, they were probably made between 1914 and 1921. Later dolls are marked “Japan.” Dolls marked “Occupied Japan,” like the baby in the center photo above, were made between 1945 and 1952.

Many Japanese all bisque dolls are jointed only at the shoulders, like the “Betty Boop” dolls pictured above. These have nothing to do with the cartoon character Betty Boop – it’s just a name that collectors use.

The Nancy Ann Storybook Dolls are American-made all bisque dolls. These were extremely popular and sold from 1936 into the 1950s, when the company switched to hard plastic. The doll pictured above is September’s Girl is Like a Storm, from the months of the year series. The Nancy Ann page and the NASB Dolls Series page have many more photos of these dolls.


China, or glazed porcelain dolls were also made in the USA. This two dolls pictured above are the Flower Girls set of Godey’s Little Lady dolls made by Ruth Gibbs of Flemington, NJ in the late forties.

There are many antique reproduction china head dolls that were made in the mid 20th century. Some were sold as kits, others were made by crafters in ceramics classes, and some were made by professional doll artists. This ad was scanned from the Spring/Summer 1958 issue of McCall’s Needlework and Crafts magazine.

Bisque was the medium of choice of many of the early doll artists. Pictured above, clockwise from top left: Meg from the Little Women series by Martha Thompson; Abigail Adams by Diana Lence Crosby; Nellie Bly by Lita Wilson and Muriel Kramer; and Miss Kentucky by Fawn Zeller. See more on the Artist Dolls page.

Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Most of the bisque or porcelain dolls produced in the second half of the 20th century were intended for adult collectors rather than children. This trend continues today. Pictured above is Marcella by Wendy Lawton.



Learn More:

cover
Collecting Rose
O’Neill’s Kewpies
by David O’Neill &
Janet O’Neill Sullivan
Find it on eBay.
cover
The American Doll Artist
Volume I
by Helen Bullard
Find it on eBay.
cover
With Kewpish Love
by Florence Theriault
Find it on eBay.

Copyright 2006-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Nov 142014
 
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This interesting clown doll has a composition head, and the rest of his body is cloth. He is unjointed and unmarked.

Unlike most clown dolls, he is not just a regular doll painted to look like a clown. His exaggerated features, including the pointy eyebrows and the “Joker” style mouth, are molded into his face.

His body is made of red and white fabric to look like a costume, but he may have originally had an outfit over that, and likely a hat, too. He probably dates to the 1920s or ’30s.



Copyright 2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Nov 142014
 
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This very unusual doll representing an Inuit boy has a composition head and hands, with the rest of his body of cloth, jointed at the shoulders and hips. His manufacturer is unknown. He likely dates to the 1930s.

Unlike most ethnic dolls of the early 20th century, he is not made of a regular-line caucasian doll and painted to look like the race is meant to represent. His head is sculpted with ethnically correct features. He has painted brown eyes and black hair. See the back of his head here.

He wears an outfit of coarse cloth painted with colorful designs. The fur trim at his hem and cuffs is real. Underneath he wears a one-piece undergarment.



Copyright 2014 by Zendelle Bouchard

Nov 072014
 
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10″ Jacqueline doll by Madame Alexander (1962). Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

See also: 21″ Jacqueline Doll by Madame Alexander

In 1962, a 10″ version of Jacqueline was introduced using the Cissette head and body. She has side-parted brunette hair in a shoulder-length flip, with a single spit curl on the forehead, brown eyes with pale blue eyeshadow and exaggerated painted lashes on each side. 10″ Jacqueline is the same doll as Margot, but with a different hairstyle. Extra outfits were available for her.

Later that year, Madame Alexander discontinued the Jacqueline line at the request of the White House.

#? – Slim silver brocade one-shoulder gown, pink satin sash with flaring side panels; pearl decorated purse; earrings. The 21″ Jacqueline has a matching outfit.

#865 – Blue slacks; matching sweater and hat; lined white leather jacket; elastic-strap heels. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

#885 – Pink satin ballgown with square neckline, bow at waist; pearl decorated evening bag; earrings and necklace. Photo courtesy of eBay seller luving_dolls

#886 – Pale peach or lilac satin evening gown with sequined trim at neckline; long matching stole with fringed ends; pearl decorated purse; earrings; nylons and elastic-strap heels.

#887 – Gown with gold lame bodice and white jacquard full skirt; full-length evening cape of rose taffeta, lined with pink jacquard; pearl decorated evening bag.

#894 – Blue two piece suit has jacket with two large covered buttons, three-quarter sleeves, straight skirt; nylon blouse; purple flowered or matching blue pillbox hat; nylons and elastic-strap heels. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

#895 – Yellow linen sheath dress; matching coat with three-quarter sleeves; yellow tulle pillbox hat; pearl drop earrings; elastic-strap heels. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll. Click here for a photo of the dress.

Copyright 1999-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard.



Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Madame Alexander Dolls 1948-1965
by Linda Crowsey
Find it on eBay.
cover
Madame Alexander’s
Ladies of Fashion
by Marjorie Sturges Uhl
Find it on eBay.
cover
Madame Alexander Dolls:
An American Legend
by Stephanie Finnegan
Find it on eBay.
Nov 052014
 
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See also: 10″ Jacqueline Doll by Madame Alexander

Madame Alexander’s 21″ Jacqueline doll was introduced in 1961. Although the Kennedy name was never used in connection with the doll, there can be little doubt that she was meant to represent the popular First Lady. Mrs. Kennedy’s wardrobe, designed by Oleg Cassini, set new standards of fashion for women around the world, and the doll version was equally glamorous. In 1962, a 10″ version was introduced using the Cissette head and body. Alexander also introduced a toddler doll named Caroline, after the Kennedy’s young daughter.

Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

The 21″ Jacqueline was made in 1961-62, using the later Cissy body with the one-piece graceful arms and a vinyl head made from a new mold. She has side-parted brunette hair in a shoulder-length flip, with a single spit curl on the forehead, brown sleep eyes with pale blue eyeshadow and exaggerated painted lashes on each side. Extra outfits were available for her.

At least two trunk sets were sold in 1962 with Jacqueline dolls, one in the FAO Schwarz catalog under the name Judy, and another in the Marshall Field catalog under the name Jackie.

Later that year, Madame Alexander discontinued the Jacqueline line at the request of the White House. Beginning in 1965, Alexander began using the 21″ doll again for their series of Portrait dolls. They reintroduced Jacqueline for collectors in the 1990s.

1961

#2133 – Orange jersey blouse; beige vinyl jacket; green corduroy slacks and matching hat; soiltaire ring; green elastic-strap heels. Sold separately.

#2218 – Suit of brocade has short jacket with three-quarter sleeves, matching straight skirt; jeweled tricot blouse; tulle pillbox hat; purse.

21″ Jacqueline doll by Madame Alexander wears #2210, satin ball gown and matching evening coat.

#2210 – Ivory satin strapless princess-cut ball gown, trimmed with silver braid; matching coat; purse made out of pearls; pearl necklace and pearl-encrusted earrings; solitaire ring; full-length taffeta petticoat; taffeta panties; nylons and silver elastic-strap sandals. Click here to see the dress.

1962

Jacqueline’s Riding Habit from 1962. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

#2117 – Riding costume of tan jacket with three brass buttons and shawl collar; white blouse; brown breeches; boots. Caroline had a matching outfit.

#2125. Photo courtesy of eBay seller your-favorite-doll.

#2125 – Slim brocade one-shoulder gown with flaring side panels of red satin; pearl necklace; earrings, ring and bracelet.

#2130 – Silver and white brocade full-skirted gown; matching jacket with elbow-length sleeves fastens with a jeweled clasp at the waistline; pearl necklace; earrings, ring and bracelet; taffeta panties and full-length petticoat.

#2140 – Full-skirted brocade ball gown; full-length satin evening coat; pearl purse; jewelry.

#22-15 – Suit with elbow-length sleeves, straight skirt, pillbox hat. Sold separately.

1963

Embassy Tea (Never officially released)- Pink sleeveless satin gown has a lace overbodice sprinkled with flocked flowers and rhinestones. The neckline and arm holes are outlined in pearls.

Embassy Tea was 21″ Jacqueline’s last ensemble. Photo courtesy of Withington Auction, Inc.

Copyright 1999-2014 by Zendelle Bouchard.



Learn More:

cover
Collector’s Encyclopedia of
Madame Alexander Dolls 1948-1965
by Linda Crowsey
Find it on eBay.
cover
Madame Alexander’s
Ladies of Fashion
by Marjorie Sturges Uhl
Find it on eBay.
cover
Madame Alexander Dolls:
An American Legend
by Stephanie Finnegan
Find it on eBay.